Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2015-16 session below. This is a new service and we welcome your feedback so we can improve it.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-20 out of 31763
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Alex Chalk
(Cheltenham)
Asked on: 21 October 2015
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Saudi Arabia
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what prison training his Department has provided to prison services in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
A
Answered by: Andrew Selous
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Details are fully documented in the NAO’s report into JSi, available here: https://www.nao.org.uk/report/investigation-into-just-solutions-international/

Q
Asked by Andrew Gwynne
(Denton and Reddish)
Asked on: 17 December 2015
Department of Health
Nurses
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will ensure that records of the training history of the nurses convicted at Nursing and Midwifery Council hearings are kept on the same basis as such data in such cases by the General Medical Council.
A
Corrected answer by: Ben Gummer
Corrected on: 02 February 2016
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 11 January 2016.
The correct answer should have been:

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is the independent regulator of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom. The NMC is responsible for delivery of its statutory functions including maintaining a register of all nurses and midwives eligible to work in the UK and for pursuing fitness to practise investigations against its registrants in the interests of public protection.

On each of the NMC and General Medical Council (GMC) websites there is a facility to search the professional registers and to check the registration status of a registrant. Where an NMC registrant has been struck-off the register, their record is removed from the register and they would not be found on a register search. However, the NMC does publish information about fitness to practise (FtP) allegations, hearings, outcomes and sanctions elsewhere on its website in accordance with its FtP publication and disclosure policy. Where a GMC registrant is erased from the medical register, their record remains and could be found in a register search with details of the FtP sanction. Both of these regulators maintain public records about individuals who have been struck off or erased from their professional registers and these records are available through their respective websites.

It is a matter for the regulators themselves to determine how they manage their publication and disclosure policy in relation to fitness to practice, within the legislative frameworks in which they operate.

A
Answered by: Ben Gummer
Answered on: 11 January 2016

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is the independent regulator of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom. The NMC is responsible for delivery of its statutory functions including maintaining a register of all nurses and midwives eligible to work in the UK and for pursuing fitness to practise investigations against its registrants in the interests of public protection.

On each of the NMC and General Medical Council (GMC) websites there is a facility to search the professional registers and to check the registration status of a registrant. Where an NMC registrant has been struck-off the register, their record is removed from the register and they would not be found on a register search. However, the NMC does publish information about fitness to practise (FtP) allegations, hearings, outcomes and sanctions elsewhere on its website in accordance with its FtP publication and disclosure policy. Where a GMC registrant is erased from the medical register, their record remains and could be found in a register search with details of the FtP sanction. Both of these regulators maintain public records about individuals who have been struck off or erased from their professional registers and these records are available through their respective websites.

It is a matter for the regulators themselves to determine how they manage their publication and disclosure policy in relation to fitness to practice, within the legislative frameworks in which they operate.

Q
Asked by Lord Rennard
Asked on: 11 January 2016
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of research from the University of East Anglia forecasting that the introduction of Individual Voter Registration will lead to a decline in levels of electoral registration.
A
Answered on: 02 February 2016

The Government is aware of research by the University of East Anglia into Individual Electoral Registration (IER) that was submitted to the Political and Constitutional Reform Committee in 2011. The electoral registers used for the 2015 General Election contained over 400,000 more entries than the last registers published prior to the introduction of IER. As such, suggestions that IER would lead to a decline in registration levels were proved incorrect.

Q
Asked by Lord Rennard
Asked on: 11 January 2016
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they have taken to ascertain how many people shown as having voted on the marked register for the General Election on 7 May 2015 were on the electoral register at that time solely by virtue of the household based electoral registration system; whether they will make any such data available, broken down by (1) country, (2) constituency, and (3) local authority; how many of those voters were removed from the electoral registers on 1 December 2015; and what plans they have to help ensure that those voters are included on electoral registers based on Individual Electoral Registration.
A
Answered on: 02 February 2016

While data is not available on the number of non-IER registered electors who voted at the 2015 General Election, the Electoral Commission found 96% of the entries on the electoral register in May 2015 were already registered under IER. The remaining non-IER registered electors will have been contacted as part of the annual canvass, and specifically targeted by Electoral Registration Officers, to encourage them to submit an application under IER ahead of the end of the transition to IER.

Q
Asked by Lord Rennard
Asked on: 11 January 2016
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have to gather data from Electoral Registration Officers about levels of electoral registration as at 1 December 2015, and whether that process will differ from practice in previous years.
A
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Electoral Registration Officers (EROs) will have published their revised registers by 1 December 2015. As in previous years the Electoral Commission will use the data from these registers to inform their assessment of the state of the December 2015 registers, which they plan to publish in late February/early March. The Cabinet Office has worked with EROs, Electoral Management Software suppliers and the EC to gather data that will assist the assessment of the December 2015 registers.

Q
Asked by Lord Rennard
Asked on: 11 January 2016
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will publish data showing the number of entries on the electoral register as at 1 December 2015; and if so, whether they will break down that information by (1) country, (2) constituency and (3) local authority.
A
Answered on: 02 February 2016

On 24th February the Office for National Statistics will publish total register entries at a local authority level for local government registers and at a constituency level for parliamentary registers. The Electoral Commission is planning to publish a report in late February/early March on the state of the December 2015 registers.

Q
Asked by Lord Rennard
Asked on: 11 January 2016
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the completeness of the electoral register as at 1 December 2015, broken down by (1) the UK in total, (2) country, (3) local authority and (4) constituency.
A
Answered on: 02 February 2016

The Electoral Commission is expected to publish their assessment of the completeness and accuracy of the first full electoral registers under IER this summer. This will provide a breakdown at a country level but not by local authority or constituency. The previous study of this nature was based on the last registers prior to the introduction IER, published in February/March 2014.

Q
Asked by Danny Kinahan
(South Antrim)
Asked on: 13 January 2016
Department for Education
Teachers: Northern Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions she has had with her Northern Ireland counterpart about the provision of England-based teaching jobs for unemployed teachers in Northern Ireland.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Officials at the Department for Education have regular discussions with their Northern Ireland counterparts. The National College of Teaching and Leadership has worked with a range of partners in Northern Ireland to ensure that teaching opportunities in England are widely promoted. These partners include:

  • Irish National Teachers’ Organisation

  • Department for Employment and Learning Employment Service

  • Department of Education Northern Ireland

  • General Teaching Council Northern Ireland

Together with these partners, the Department has helped prospective teachers in Northern Ireland find vacancies in England through the Get Into Teaching website. The Teaching School Council and Regional School Commissioners also promoted teaching opportunities in England. Schools in the West Midlands, North West and East of England engaged with and benefited from these initiatives.

Q
Asked by Lord Greaves
Asked on: 18 January 2016
Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Outdoor Recreation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the role of (1) the Department for Culture, Media And Sport, (2) the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (3) the Department of Health, (4) the Department for Education, and (5) the Department for Communities and Local Government, in the promotion of non-competitive outdoor activities; the provision of, and access to, outdoor green spaces, and the development of healthier life styles by involvement in such activities and the use of such spaces; what priority they give to the promotion of such activities; and which is the lead department in this area.
A
Answered by: Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Government recognises the importance of cross-government cooperation in considering policies which impact on the provision, access and promotion of outside spaces. There is not one single government department, which that leads on the promotion of healthier lifestyles through non-competitive outdoor recreation activities. Instead, Government departments jointly recognise the value of outdoor recreation to health, environment and education. Outdoor recreation is referenced in the Government’s new sport and physical activity strategy, which was published on 17th December 2015. Government will submit a formal annual report to Parliament, which sets out progress in implementing this strategy later this year. Individual government department’s involvement in outdoor activities is outlined below:

Department for Culture, Media and Sport

The importance of outdoor recreation is reflected in our new sport and physical activity strategy, published in December 2015. Sport England is currently working with the Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) on the ‘Getting Active Outdoors’ insight report - the largest ever of its kind - to get the nation active - particularly children, pensioners and women. In the meantime, Sport England is investing over £68 million in outdoor recreation sports, including £3 million invested in the Britain on Foot campaign, to get more people hillwalking, trail running and mountaineering.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs holds policy responsibility for the legal and land-use aspects of access to the countryside (in forests, protected landscapes, on public rights of way, commons, town and village greens, open access spaces and on waterways).

The Department of Health

The Department of Health acknowledges the health benefits of being in a natural environment are significant and that it is important that children have opportunities to play in clean, secure outdoor environments. The department recognises the importance of outdoor activities and they have included an indicator on use of green space for exercise and health purposes in the Public Health Outcomes Framework. The health promotes outdoor physical activity through a variety of channels, which includes: Change4Life Sports Clubs - a programme providing indoor and outdoor non-competitive physical activity to the least active children; the 10 Minute Shake Up campaign - Change4Life teamed up with Disney to inspire children to get active with over the summers of 2014 and 2015; providing funding of over 1million to Play England for a three year project ‘Street Play’ to promote outdoor play activities; and National Institute of Care and Excellence (NICE) guidance to promoting outdoor physical activity.

The Department for Education

The Department for Education are is determined that all children lead healthy active lives. Physical Education is compulsory at all four key stages in the national curriculum for maintained schools. The programmes of study at key stages 2, 3 and 4 sets out the expectation that pupils should take part in outdoor adventurous activities. At key stage 4 these activities should take place in a range of environments and present intellectual and physical challenges. Independent research on the primary PE and sport premium demonstrates that some schools are using their funding to provide enhanced opportunities for their pupils in this area – including rock-climbing, surfing and sailing. The Department does not specifically promote non-competitive outdoor activities as teachers have the freedom to organise and deliver the curriculum to ensure it is challenging and effectively meets programme of study.

The Department for Communities and Local Government

The Department for Communities and Local Government role in outdoor recreation is community focussed. It recognises that Parks, sports grounds and other green spaces, which are shared by lots of people, holds great benefits to the health and wellbeing of local communities. We want local communities to be empowered to play a significant role in maintaining and protecting green spaces of most importance to them. The Department owns the Green Flag Award scheme, a recognised accreditation setting the national standard for parks and green spaces across the UK, which is currently run under licence by Keep Britain Tidy. The scheme awards well-managed green spaces run by the local authority and has a separate category for community managed green spaces. The Department is currently running a Pocket Parks programme to establish up to 100 pocket parks – small areas of inviting public space where people can enjoy relief from city streets. It is expected that an announcement of the successful projects will be made in February. Through the Community Right to Bid, communities are listing the parks and green spaces that are important to them. Hundreds have been listed including allotments and playing fields.

Q
(Leeds North West)
Asked on: 18 January 2016
Home Office
Visas: Catering
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the effect of the Tier 2 visa scheme's minimum salary threshold on the ability of curry restaurants to recruit chefs from abroad.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Acquiring this information on visa applications from chefs would involve examining each individual case record held by UK Visas & Immigration for the Tier 2 category. To do so would incur a disproportionate cost.

The Home Office regularly receives representations to lower the criteria (including the salary requirement) for sponsoring chefs under Tier 2, the skilled worker route. Tier 2 is, however, reserved for graduate level occupations. We continue to welcome the very top chefs who promote innovative and authentic cuisine here in the UK — and these types of skilled chefs are on the shortage occupation list. The salary threshold applied to chefs was based on expert advice from the independent Migration Advisory Committee.

We have been clear, however, that the restaurant industry needs to move away from an unsustainable reliance on migrant workers. We want to nurture more home-grown talent and encourage young people in this country who want to pursue a skilled career. This means the restaurant sector offering training to attract and recruit resident workers to meet their staffing needs.

The industry is starting to make progress in this area, recruiting and training more chefs in the UK, and this needs to continue.

Grouped Questions: 22777 | 22778
Q
(Leeds North West)
Asked on: 18 January 2016
Home Office
Visas: Catering
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for Tier 2 visas were made by people holding job offers to become chefs in each year since such visas were introduced; and how many such applications were successful.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Acquiring this information on visa applications from chefs would involve examining each individual case record held by UK Visas & Immigration for the Tier 2 category. To do so would incur a disproportionate cost.

The Home Office regularly receives representations to lower the criteria (including the salary requirement) for sponsoring chefs under Tier 2, the skilled worker route. Tier 2 is, however, reserved for graduate level occupations. We continue to welcome the very top chefs who promote innovative and authentic cuisine here in the UK — and these types of skilled chefs are on the shortage occupation list. The salary threshold applied to chefs was based on expert advice from the independent Migration Advisory Committee.

We have been clear, however, that the restaurant industry needs to move away from an unsustainable reliance on migrant workers. We want to nurture more home-grown talent and encourage young people in this country who want to pursue a skilled career. This means the restaurant sector offering training to attract and recruit resident workers to meet their staffing needs.

The industry is starting to make progress in this area, recruiting and training more chefs in the UK, and this needs to continue.

Grouped Questions: 22779 | 22778
Q
(Leeds North West)
Asked on: 18 January 2016
Home Office
Visas: Catering
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what representations she has received on lowering the Tier 2 visa scheme's minimum salary threshold for chefs.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Acquiring this information on visa applications from chefs would involve examining each individual case record held by UK Visas & Immigration for the Tier 2 category. To do so would incur a disproportionate cost.

The Home Office regularly receives representations to lower the criteria (including the salary requirement) for sponsoring chefs under Tier 2, the skilled worker route. Tier 2 is, however, reserved for graduate level occupations. We continue to welcome the very top chefs who promote innovative and authentic cuisine here in the UK — and these types of skilled chefs are on the shortage occupation list. The salary threshold applied to chefs was based on expert advice from the independent Migration Advisory Committee.

We have been clear, however, that the restaurant industry needs to move away from an unsustainable reliance on migrant workers. We want to nurture more home-grown talent and encourage young people in this country who want to pursue a skilled career. This means the restaurant sector offering training to attract and recruit resident workers to meet their staffing needs.

The industry is starting to make progress in this area, recruiting and training more chefs in the UK, and this needs to continue.

Grouped Questions: 22779 | 22777
Q
Asked by Earl Attlee
Asked on: 19 January 2016
Attorney General
Police Interrogation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are the implications of the police indicating to a person being interviewed under caution that no further action will be taken due to insufficient, or a lack of, evidence.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 02 February 2016

The implications in such circumstances are detailed in a written answer on 31 March 1993 by the then Attorney General (Sir Nicholas Lyell), as outlined below.

The fundamental consideration remains that individuals should be able to rely on decisions taken by the prosecuting authorities. The policy of the Director of Public Prosecutions is that a decision to terminate proceedings or not to prosecute should not, in the absence of special circumstances, be altered once it has been communicated to the defendant or prospective defendant unless it was taken and expressed to be taken because the evidence was insufficient. In such a case it would be appropriate to reconsider the decision if further significant evidence were to become available at a later date especially if the alleged offence is a serious one.

Special circumstances which might justify departure from this policy include:

(1) rare cases where reconsiderations of the original decision show that it was not justified and the maintenance of confidence in the criminal justice system requires that a prosecution be brought notwithstanding the earlier decision; and

(2) those cases where termination has been effected specifically with a view to the collection and preparation of the necessary evidence which is thought likely to become available in the fairly near future. In such circumstances the CPS will advise the defendant of the possibility that proceedings will be re-instituted. (Official Report, Col’s 200-201).

Following this written answer and further written ministerial statements, the Crown Prosecution Service has produced guidance for prosecutors to follow concerning the exercise of the CPS discretion to institute, reinstitute or continue proceedings after a suspect has been informed by the police or CPS of a decision not to prosecute. The above mentioned Written Statements are detailed below and are published in the Official Report.

WMS – Crown Prosecutors Code - 22 February 2010. Column WS64, Baroness Scotland of Asthal.

WMS - Reconsidering a Prosecution Decision (CPS Guidance) - 31 October 2012, Col 15WS, Rt. Hon Dominic Grieve

WMS – Victim’s Right to Review - 5 June 2013, Col 99WS, Rt. Hon Dominic Grieve

Asked on: 19 January 2016
Department for Communities and Local Government
Travellers
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they last undertook an assessment of the long-term educational and welfare needs of Travellers and Gypsies in the UK.
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Both the Department for Education and Ofsted have commissioned and published a number of studies over the past six years that focus on how to improve the education of Gypsy and Traveller children. These include:

Improving the outcomes for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller pupils: final report and literature re
view (Department for Education, October 2010, attached).https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/improving-the-outcomes-for-gypsy-roma-and-traveller-pupils-final-report; as well as case studies of schools showing successful practice in improving the attendance and attainment of Gypsy, Traveller and Roma pupils. These are available (attached) at: https://www.gov.uk/government/case-studies/gypsy-roma-and-traveller-pupils-supporting-access-to-education and https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/ofsted-examples-of-good-practice-in-schools#gypsy-traveller-and-roma-children.

The Department for Education regularly publishes and monitors data on the educational progress and achievement of pupils from Gypsy and Irish Traveller backgrounds attending schools in England. This data includes annual statistics on the attainment of pupils from these groups in the year 1 phonics screening check; teacher assessments at the end of key stage 1 and national assessments at the end of key stages 2 and 4; and on levels of pupil attendance at, and exclusion from, school. Inspection reports published by Ofsted include commentary where appropriate on the quality of school provision for Gypsy and Traveller pupils and their progress and attainment.

The previous Government’s Ministerial Working Group on Gypsy and Traveller inequalities published a report in April 2012, which included 28 commitments from across Government to help reduce the inequalities experienced by Gypsies and Travellers. The document can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reducing-inequalities-for-gypsies-and-travellers-progress-report

The 28 commitments have since been taken forward by the relevant Government departments and a table setting out progress against those commitments as at October 2014 was deposited in the House of Lords library. This is available at: http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Lords/2014-10-29/HL2504/

Good Practice (Word Document, 422.5 KB)
Travellers Pupils final report (PDF Document, 2.09 MB)
Access to education (PDF Document, 880.58 KB)
Asked on: 19 January 2016
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Nurses: Training
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the planned replacement of student bursaries by loans, how many grants for higher cost students will be made to universities in respect of degree courses in nursing in 2017–18.
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Institutional autonomy and academic freedom are key strengths of our higher education system. To protect these, the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 prohibits Ministers from being involved in decisions about funding for individual institutions or particular courses. Details on teaching grant funding will be set out in the normal way in the annual grant letter from ministers to The Higher Education Funding Council.

As part of the changes announced at the Spending Review, we will lift the cap on the number of students that can get on to nursing courses and provide nursing students with access to around 25% more financial support. We expect this reform to enable universities to provide up to 10,000 additional nursing, midwifery and allied health training places over this parliament.

Q
Asked on: 19 January 2016
HM Treasury
Debts: Advisory Services
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the case for a mandatory fee model whereby Financial Conduct Authority authorised debt management firms charge a set fee for debt management plans; and what assessment they have made of how to prevent debt management companies from making additional charges.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Neill of Gatley
Answered on: 02 February 2016

The Government has fundamentally reformed the regulation of the debt management market, transferring responsibility to the Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA) more robust regime to better protect consumers.

Any consideration of the state of the debt management market should properly await the outcome of the FCA’s authorisation assessment of commercial debt management firms, which is expected in the coming months.

FCA rules make it clear that fees charged for debt management plans should not undermine the customer’s ability to make significant repayments to the customer’s lenders throughout the duration of the debt management plan.

Grouped Questions: HL5193
Q
Asked on: 19 January 2016
HM Treasury
Debts: Advisory Services
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the use of (1) monthly fee debt management plans; (2) percentage fee debt management plans; and (3) a combination of set fee and percentage debt management plans.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Neill of Gatley
Answered on: 02 February 2016

The Government has fundamentally reformed the regulation of the debt management market, transferring responsibility to the Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA) more robust regime to better protect consumers.

Any consideration of the state of the debt management market should properly await the outcome of the FCA’s authorisation assessment of commercial debt management firms, which is expected in the coming months.

FCA rules make it clear that fees charged for debt management plans should not undermine the customer’s ability to make significant repayments to the customer’s lenders throughout the duration of the debt management plan.

Grouped Questions: HL5192
Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 19 January 2016
Department for Education
Home Education
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are the legal responsibilities of those parents who choose to teach their children at home.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Parents of a child of compulsory school age must comply with the duty in section 7 of the Education Act 1996 to cause the child to receive efficient full-time education suitable to the child’s age, ability and aptitude, and to any special educational needs the child may have, either by regular attendance at school or otherwise. They can meet this duty by electing to educate at home, which is referred to in the Act as education ‘otherwise than at school’.

Local authorities do not have a general responsibility to monitor the education provided by parents, for the purposes of ensuring that parents are meeting their responsibilities. An authority has a duty under s.436A of the Education Act 1996 to make arrangements to establish the identities of children who are not receiving a suitable education. However, the fact that a child is educated at home does not necessarily mean that the child is not receiving a suitable education.

Should it appear that the child is not receiving suitable education, the local authority has a duty under s.437(1) of the Education Act 1996 to serve a notice requiring the parent to satisfy the authority that the child is indeed receiving a suitable education. If the parent is unable to satisfy the authority, and the authority considers it expedient for the child to attend school, then the local authority must issue a school attendance order.

These matters are set out in guidance issued by the Department for Education to local authorities.

Grouped Questions: HL5210
Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 19 January 2016
Department for Education
Home Education
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what responsibilities local authorities have to ensure that home tuition is carried out within legal requirements.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 02 February 2016

Parents of a child of compulsory school age must comply with the duty in section 7 of the Education Act 1996 to cause the child to receive efficient full-time education suitable to the child’s age, ability and aptitude, and to any special educational needs the child may have, either by regular attendance at school or otherwise. They can meet this duty by electing to educate at home, which is referred to in the Act as education ‘otherwise than at school’.

Local authorities do not have a general responsibility to monitor the education provided by parents, for the purposes of ensuring that parents are meeting their responsibilities. An authority has a duty under s.436A of the Education Act 1996 to make arrangements to establish the identities of children who are not receiving a suitable education. However, the fact that a child is educated at home does not necessarily mean that the child is not receiving a suitable education.

Should it appear that the child is not receiving suitable education, the local authority has a duty under s.437(1) of the Education Act 1996 to serve a notice requiring the parent to satisfy the authority that the child is indeed receiving a suitable education. If the parent is unable to satisfy the authority, and the authority considers it expedient for the child to attend school, then the local authority must issue a school attendance order.

These matters are set out in guidance issued by the Department for Education to local authorities.

Grouped Questions: HL5209
Q
Asked by Kevin Brennan
(Cardiff West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 January 2016
Department for Energy and Climate Change
Environment Protection: Investment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate her Department has made of the amount of (a) public and (b) private sector investment needed to fulfil Government targets for low-carbon infrastructure and supply chain investment in each year to 2025.
A
Answered by: Andrea Leadsom
Answered on: 02 February 2016
Holding answer received on 25 January 2016

The National Infrastructure Pipeline provides annual estimates of investment in the Energy Sector. The 2015 publication of the National Infrastructure Pipeline [1] estimates £141bn worth of investment up to 2020/21 with a further £103bn post 2020/21. The figures do not distinguish between private and public investment.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-infrastructure-pipeline-july-2015

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-20 out of 31763
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100