Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2014-15 session below. This is a new service and we welcome your feedback so we can improve it.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Indentifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-20 out of 31417
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 04 February 2015
Department for Education
History: Curriculum
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they have taken to ensure that pre-colonial world history is given greater emphasis in the national curriculum; and what steps they have taken to ensure that European colonialism and its consequences are given greater emphasis in the national curriculum.
A
Answered by: Lord Nash
Answered on: 18 February 2015

The requirements for the mandatory history curriculum, taught in maintained schools in England from September 2014, can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-history-programmes-of-study

Pupils should be taught about world as well as British history. At key stage 2 for example, pupils should be taught a non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.

The new curriculum is less prescriptive than before, which gives teachers more freedom over the precise content that should be taught, including pre-colonial world history or European colonialism and its consequences.

Q
Asked on: 05 February 2015
HM Treasury
Wines: Exports
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their estimate of the total value of United Kingdom wine exported in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Lord Deighton
Answered on: 18 February 2015

HM Revenue & Customs is responsible for the collection of data on UK imports and exports. From the collected trade data however, we cannot identify exports of UK produced wine.

The total value of all wine exported from the UK (exports of UK produced wine and exports of wine produced elsewhere) in each of the last five years is:

Year

Value (£)

2010

426,546,147

2011

542,538,414

2012

443,696,522

2013

445,606,225

2014

452,566,271

Source: HMRC Overseas Trade Statistics

Note:

1) 2014 data is subject to update

2) Data is for wine, including fortified wine (HS2204 excluding HS2204 30)

3) Trade is presented on a General Trade basis

4) EU Trade includes Below Threshold Trade Allocations (BTTAs)

Asked on: 05 February 2015
Department of Health
Bone Marrow Disorders
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 4 February (HL4499), where the four trials for systemic amyloidosis and 41 trials for multiple myeloma which are currently in progress are being hosted.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 18 February 2015

The sponsors of the trials have included the following information in the European Union clinical trials register concerning the sites involved in the studies.

1. Systemic amyloidosis

Institution

Town/City

Manchester Royal Infirmary

Manchester

National Amyloidosis Centre

London

Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust

Oxford

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

London

University College London Medical School

London

University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust

Birmingham

2. Multiple myeloma

Institution

Town/City

Aberdeen Royal Infirmary

Aberdeen

Tameside Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Ashton-under-Lyne

Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board

Bangor

Gwynedd Hospital

Bangor - Gwynedd

Barnet And Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

Barnet

North Hampshire District Hospital

Basingstoke

Royal United Hospitals Bath NHS Foundation Trust

Bath

Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast City Hospital

Belfast

Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust

Birmingham

University Hospitals Birmingham, NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Birmingham

Blackpool Victoria Hospital NHS Trust

Blackpool

Royal Bournemouth Hospital

Bournemouth

Bradford Institute of Health Research

Bradford

Bradford Royal Infirmary

Bradford

Royal Sussex County Hospital

Brighton

Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre

Bristol

Southmead Hospital

Bristol

University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust

Bristol

Burnley General Hospital

Burnley, Lancashire

Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Burton

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke's Hospital

Cambridge

Kent and Canterbury Hospital

Canterbury

East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust

Canterbury Kent

Cardiff and Vale University Health Board

Cardiff

Cardiff University School of Medicine

Cardiff

University Hospital of Wales

Cardiff

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

Carshalton

Ashford and St Peters Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Chertsey

Countess of Chester Hospital

Chester

Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Chesterfield

North Tees And Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust

Cleveland

Colchester Hospital University Foundation Trust

Colchester

Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

Cottingham

Walsgrave Hospital

Coventry

Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Crewe

Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust

Dartford

Royal Derby Hospital

Derby

Dorset County Hospital Foundation Trust

Dorchester

NHS Tayside

Dundee

Ninewells Hospital

Dundee

Lothian NHS Health Board

Edinburgh

Western General Hospital

Edinburgh

Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital

Exeter

Frimley Park Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Frimley

Medway NHS Foundation Trust

Gillingham

Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre

Glasgow

Gartnavel General Hospital

Glasgow

Glasgow Royal Infirmary

Glasgow

Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Guildford

Royal Free Hospital

Hampstead, London

Princess Alexandra Hospital

Harlow

Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust

Harrogate

Northwest London Hospitals NHS Trust

Harrow

Northwick Park Hospital

Harrow

The Oxford Radcliffe Hospital

Headington

The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Newcastle-Upon-Tyne Tyne and Wear

Raigmore Hospital

Inverness

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

Isleworth

Maidstone Hospital

Kent

South London Healthcare Trust

Kent

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital King's Lynn NHS Foundation Trust

King's Lynn

Clinical Trials Research Unit, University of Leeds

Leeds

Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

Leeds

St James University Hospital NHS Trust

Leeds

Leicester Royal Infirmary

Leicester

University Hospitals Of Leicester NHS Trust

Leicester

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

Leytonstone

Lincoln County Hospital

Lincoln

Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Liverpool

University Hospital Aintree NHS Trust

Liverpool

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

London

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

London

Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry

London

Barts Health NHS Trust

London

Cancer Centre

London

Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

London

Hammersmith Hospital

London

Imperial College Healthcare NHS trust

London

Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital

London

Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

London

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

London

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

London

Royal Free and University College Medical School

London

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

London

Sarah Cannon Research Institute UK

London

UCL Cancer Institute

London

East Cheshire NHS Trust

Macclesfield

Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust

Maidstone

Kent Oncology Centre

Maidstone, Kent

Manchester Royal Infirmary

Manchester

The Christie NHS Foundation Trust

Manchester

University of South Manchester Hospital NHS Trust

Manchester

Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Manchester

Prince Charles Hospital

Merthyr Tydfil

Freeman Hospital

Newcastle

Royal Victoria Infirmary

Newcastle upon Tyne

Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust

Northampton

Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

Nottingham

Royal Oldham Hospital

Oldham

Churchill Hospital

Oxford

Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trust

Oxford

Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust

Oxfordshire

Derriford Hospital

Plymouth

Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust

Plymouth

Poole Hospital Foundation Trust

Poole

Queen Alexandra Hospital

Portsmith

Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust

Redhill

Glan Clywd Hospital

Rhyl, North Wales

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

Romford

Scarborough and North East Yorkshire NHS Trust

Scarborough

Royal Hallamshire Hospital

Sheffield

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Sheffield

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

Southall

Southampton General Hospital

Southampton

University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust

Southampton, Hampshire

Lister Hospital

Stevenage

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

Sutton, Surrey

Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board

Swansea

Singleton Hospital

Swansea

Great Western Hospitals NHS Trust

Swindon

Taunton and Somerset Hospital

Taunton

South Devon Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

Torquay

Torbay District Hospital

Torquay

The Hillingdon Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Uxbridge

Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust

West Bromwich

Pinderfields General Hospital

West Yorkshire

North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital

Westbury-on-Trym / Bristol

New Cross Hospital

Wolverhampton

The Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust

Wolverhampton

Lewisham & Greenwich NHS Trust ( Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woolwich)

Woolwich

Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust

Wycombe

Asked on: 06 February 2015
Ministry of Justice
Television: Licensing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people received custodial sentences in the last 10 years, broken down by gender, for the non-payment of fines relating to television licences; for how many of those people this was their sole offence; and how long the average sentence was.
A
Answered by: Lord Faulks
Answered on: 18 February 2015

Offenders found guilty of TV licence evasion may be sentenced to a fine and there is an expectation that fines are paid immediately where possible. HM Courts and Tribunals Service takes the issue of fine enforcement very seriously and is working to ensure that the recovery of fines is a continued priority nationwide. Failure to pay a fine imposed for TV licence evasion can lead to committal to prison for fine default, but only as a last resort once all other methods of recovering the money have been considered or tried and have failed.

Information about the length of time for which men and women were committed to prison for failing to pay a fine imposed for non-payment of a TV licence, since 2005, is provided in the table. The data relates to the fine defaulter's principal offence: information about whether it was their sole offence is not collected.

Fine defaulter receptions for non-payment of a TV licence, by sex and average sentence length, England and Wales, January 2005- September 2014
200520062007200820092010(1)201120122013Jan-Sep 2014
Fine defaulter receptions for non-payment of a TV licence
Males2121171911..10251510
Females83101619..38261724
Average sentence length in days
Males1414112017..20192519
Females176171617..24252318
Data Sources and Quality
These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.
(1) During 2010 there was a disruption to the supply of the prison receptions data which is used for the purpose of statistical reporting.
Asked on: 06 February 2015
Ministry of Justice
Television: Licensing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what guidance is given to the courts on sentencing for non-payment of fines in relation to failure to pay for television licences.
A
Answered by: Lord Faulks
Answered on: 18 February 2015

The courts are provided with guidance on sentencing and other ways of dealing with offenders, such as fine enforcement, by sentencing guidelines. These are issued by the Sentencing Council, which is independent of Government. The enforcement of fines imposed for the offence of TV licence evasion, which is non-imprisonable, is dealt with by the magistrates’ courts. The Magistrates’ Court Sentencing Guidelines can be found at the link:

http://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/MCSG_web_-_October_2014.pdf

Pages 156 to 159 of the guidelines provide guidance to the courts on the enforcement of fines. This applies to all fines enforced by the magistrates’ courts: there is no specific guidance on dealing with offenders who have failed to pay a fine imposed for the offence of TV licence evasion.

The courts are required by law to follow any relevant sentencing guidelines unless it would be contrary to the interests of justice to do so.

Asked on: 06 February 2015
Department for Culture Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, for each of the national museums and galleries in the United Kingdom (1) how many staff are employed, and (2) how many of those are now employed through private contractors.
A
Answered on: 18 February 2015

The DCMS is responsible for 13 National sponsored Museums and Galleries in England; other National Museums in the UK are the responsibility of the devolved administrations, and other departments. The Museums that DCMS does sponsor operate at arm’s length from the department, and as such are responsible for their own staffing arrangements. We do not hold the data for staff employed through private contracts, and it would incur disproportionate cost to find out. We do hold details of the museums in house employees in the Public Bodies 2014 publication (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/public-bodies-2014). As of 31 March 2014 the number of Full Time Equivalent employees was:

Museum

Number of Staff

(Full-Time Equivalent)

British Museum

1033

Imperial War Museum

572

National Gallery

407

National Museums Liverpool

521

National Portrait Gallery

247

Natural History Museum

822

Royal Armouries

145

Royal Museums Greenwich

478

Science Museum Group

833

Sir John Soane’s Museum

44

Tate

1228

Victoria and Albert Museum

634

Wallace Collection

94

Asked on: 06 February 2015
Department for Culture Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government which services within each of the national museums and galleries in the United Kingdom have been privatised; and for each of those services how many staff are employed.
A
Answered on: 18 February 2015

The DCMS sponsored National Museums and Galleries operate at arm’s length from the department and as such the department does not hold this information and it would incur disproportionate cost to find out.

Q
Asked by Lord Luce
Asked on: 09 February 2015
HM Treasury
British Overseas Territories
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they consider that United Kingdom Overseas Territories are maintaining adequate regulatory mechanisms for offshore financial services and the common reporting standards for automatic exchange of information across borders as required by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development; and whether they will provide a comparison on the extent to which each United Kingdom Overseas Territory conforms with the required standards.
A
Answered by: Lord Deighton
Answered on: 18 February 2015

The Overseas Territories are separate jurisdictions and each has their own independent supervisory authority responsible for ensuring their financial services meet regulatory standards. The Overseas Territories are subject to assessment by the international standard setter for anti-money laundering, the Financial Action Task Force. This looks specifically at the effectiveness of each jurisdiction’s regimes. The Territories are due their next assessments over the coming years and the results of these will be publicly available.

In 2013, the Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories agreed to begin bilateral automatic exchange of financial information for tax purposes with the UK ‎in 2016, in respect of 2014 data. These were ground breaking agreements and are expected to recoup over £1 billion of unpaid tax.

The Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories also committed in 2013 to be early adopters of the new global standard for automatic exchange, joining the initiative launched by the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Spain and providing a lead to other jurisdictions. Along with the UK, in October 2014 the Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories signed the legal agreements under which exchange will begin with over 50 countries in 2017 and over 90 countries in 2018. These agreements, under which a wide range of information concerning financial accounts of UK tax residents will be passed to HMRC automatically each year, will significantly enhance the ability of HMRC to tackle offshore evasion.

‎Monitoring of implementation of the global standard of automatic tax information exchange will be undertaken in due course by the Global Forum as requested by G20 Finance Ministers. Written assessments of the extent to which Global Forum members meet the existing standard of tax information exchange on request are publically available on the Global Forum’s website.

Asked on: 10 February 2015
Home Office
Police: Road Traffic Control
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many traffic police (as full-time equivalent) have been employed in Essex in each year from 2010 to date.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 18 February 2015

The table provided shows the number and proportion of full-time equivalent police officers within the traffic function for Essex police force, as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2014.

The variation in the figures between 2013 and 2014 is due to a review of the functionality of roles within the force as part of their Change Programme.

Number of and proportion of full-time equivalent1 police officers within the traffic function2, 3 in Essex police force,

as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2014.4

Number

Proportion of total police officers (%)

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Essex5

257

227

229

217

76

7.1

6.3

6.7

6.6

2.4

1. This table contains full-time equivalent figures that have been presented to the nearest whole number.

2. Traffic function includes staff who are predominantly employed on motor-cycles or in patrol vehicles for the policing of traffic and motorway related duties. This includes officers employed in accident investigation, vehicle examination, radar duties and those working with hazardous chemicals.

3. Staff with multiple responsibilities (or designations) are recorded under their primary role or function. This may explain some variability between years.

4. Figures have been confirmed by all police forces after collection and before publication each year.

5. The variation in Essex Police’s figures between 2013 and 2014 is due to a review of the functionality of roles within the force as part of their Change Programme.

Full time equivalent police officers (Excel SpreadSheet, 11.12 KB)
Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 09 September 2014
Ministry of Justice
Drugs: Misuse
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many previous convictions at the time of sentence each offender sentenced to immediate custody for a single offence of possession of (a) class A, (b) class B and (c) class C drugs had in the most recent year for which figures are available.
A
Corrected answer by: Mike Penning
Corrected on: 17 February 2015
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 18 November 2014.
The correct answer should have been:

Drug offending is serious in itself and drug abuse also underlies a huge volume of acquisitive and violent crime which can blight communities. Previous convictions, where they are recent and relevant, must be treated as an aggravating factor by the courts and will make the sentence more severe. The independent Sentencing Council issued a sentencing guideline on drug offences, effective from February 2012, which brought sentencing guidance together for the first time to help to ensure consistent and proportionate sentencing for all drug offences that come before courts.

The table below shows the number of offenders sentenced to immediate custody for the possession of (a) class A, (b) class B and (c) class C drugs offence in England and Wales, for the 12 months ending March 2014, by the number of previous convictions.

Immediate custody for drug offences (Excel SpreadSheet, 35 KB)
Immediate custody for drug offences (Excel SpreadSheet, 35 KB)
A
Answered by: Mike Penning
Answered on: 18 November 2014

Drug offending is serious in itself and drug abuse also underlies a huge volume of acquisitive and violent crime which can blight communities. Previous convictions, where they are recent and relevant, must be treated as an aggravating factor by the courts and will make the sentence more severe. The independent Sentencing Council issued a sentencing guideline on drug offences, effective from February 2012, which brought sentencing guidance together for the first time to help to ensure consistent and proportionate sentencing for all drug offences that come before courts.

The table below shows the number of offenders sentenced to immediate custody for the possession of (a) class A, (b) class B and (c) class C drugs offence in England and Wales, for the 12 months ending March 2014, by the number of previous convictions.

Immediate custody for drug offences (Excel SpreadSheet, 35 KB)
Immediate custody for drug offences (Excel SpreadSheet, 35 KB)
Q
(Birmingham, Northfield)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 January 2015
HM Treasury
National Savings Bonds: Pensioners
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what (a) assessment he has made of the efficiency of and (b) representations he has received about the telephone service for pensioner bond applications.
A
Answered by: Mr David Gauke
Answered on: 17 February 2015

This product launch has had the biggest opening sales of any retail financial product in Britain’s modern history. In advance of the launch NS&I doubled the size of their call centres, and have now added further staff to help manage the high call volumes.

Average call waiting times vary depending on time of day and different phone lines.

Low interest rates have played an important part in stimulating the recovery. But there are those – especially pensioners – who rely on a reasonable rate of interest on their savings. These new savings bonds pay a market leading rate and are designed to help support those who rely on their savings in retirement.

Grouped Questions: 221483
Q
(Birmingham, Northfield)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 January 2015
HM Treasury
National Savings Bonds: Pensioners
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the average waiting time was for calls to the pensioner bond application telephone service in each year for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Mr David Gauke
Answered on: 17 February 2015

This product launch has had the biggest opening sales of any retail financial product in Britain’s modern history. In advance of the launch NS&I doubled the size of their call centres, and have now added further staff to help manage the high call volumes.

Average call waiting times vary depending on time of day and different phone lines.

Low interest rates have played an important part in stimulating the recovery. But there are those – especially pensioners – who rely on a reasonable rate of interest on their savings. These new savings bonds pay a market leading rate and are designed to help support those who rely on their savings in retirement.

Grouped Questions: 221484
Q
Asked by Lord Harrison
Asked on: 02 February 2015
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Small Businesses: Productivity
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to improve the productivity of small businesses.
A
Answered by: Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Answered on: 17 February 2015

Government policy focuses on delivering growth which in turn depends on productivity in the longer term.

We have already set out our four key growth ambitions: creating the most competitive tax system in the G20, making the UK the best place in Europe to start, finance and grow a business, encouraging investment and exports, and creating a more educated workforce. And through our industrial strategy, the whole of government is taking a long-term strategic approach to working in partnership with businesses to increase global competitiveness, support innovation and maximise export potential.

The right tax environment is vital to help businesses flourish so we have cut the main rate of Corporation Tax from 28% to 21% and announced further cuts to 20% by 2015 – the joint lowest rate in the G20 major economies. We have helped businesses with the cost of hiring staff by introducing a new Employer Allowance which cuts £2,000 from the National Insurance bills of small firms. To support small businesses in local communities, the ‘high street discount’ for around 300,000 shops, pubs, cafes and restaurants will go up from £1,000 to £1,500, from April 2015 to March 2016. This is in addition to doubling Small Business Rate Relief for a further year which means 380,000 of the smallest businesses will pay no rates at all.



R&D Tax Credits are the single largest Government support for business investment in R&D. They are designed to encourage greater R&D spend by business leading, in turn, to greater investment in innovation and improved products and processes. The rate of relief under the SME scheme is one of the most competitive rates in the world and, at Autumn Statement 2014, was increased from 225% to 230% of qualifying R&D expenditure from April 2015. Innovate UK is the Government’s prime channel for supporting business-led technology innovation. It delivers a range of programmes in support of businesses undertaking R&D including Collaborative R&D, Smart and Knowledge Transfer Partnerships. Innovate UK also provides opportunities for innovative businesses through the growing network of Catapult centres. Under the Coalition Government, Innovate UK, with partner and business contributions, has invested around £3.5 billion in innovation projects across the UK.

More businesses are getting access to the finance they need to start up and grow with Start-Up Loans offered to over 25,000 businesses; so far lending over £129 million. The British Business Bank has facilitated £890m of new lending and investment to over 21,000 small businesses in the year to the end of September 2014. And we have facilitated over £1.67 billion of lending to over 16,000 small businesses since May 2010, through our Enterprise Finance Guarantee scheme. We have brought together all Government advice and support in one place at GREATbusiness.gov.uk, where the ‘My Business Support Tool’ helps businesses find the support they need quickly, and businesses can speak to or webchat with a helpline adviser direct using the Business Support helpline. Businesses can also access our new Business Growth Service on the website, which brings together expert advice to improve and grow in one place, including Growth Accelerator, the Manufacturing Advisory Service, and export advice and finance.

Small businesses have less regulation to follow with a £10 billion cumulative net saving to businesses as a result of our deregulation work. Through the Red Tape Challenge, we have reviewed over 5,600 regulations and identified 3,000 to scrap or improve. We are on track to surpass our target of saving business £850 million per year.

And around 48,000 businesses have been helped by our UKTI support – of which 90% were small businesses. This support helped generate additional sales of over £49 billion and created or safeguarded over 220,000 jobs over the last year.

Asked on: 02 February 2015
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Bates on 19 December (HL3453, HL3455 and HL3456), whether the multi-agency guidelines to support better co-ordination of guidance on protecting girls from female genital mutilation have any relationship to public agencies in Scotland; and if not, what coordination exists between those guidelines and the guidelines that operate in Scotland.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 17 February 2015

The Government is committed to tackling female genital mutilation (FGM). The multi-agency practice guidelines on FGM are designed for application in England
and Wales. The guidelines include a weblink to information on the Scottish Government’s work on FGM.

The 42 joint protocols between the police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service apply in England and Wales only.

The 2007 and 2014 prevalence studies part-funded by the Home Office cover the number of girls and women affected by FGM in England and Wales. The full version of the 2014 study including data disaggregated at a local level in England and Wales will be published shortly.

The Government’s new specialist FGM Unit will work in consultation with partners in Scotland, as appropriate, to ensure a joined up approach to tackling FGM across the UK.

Grouped Questions: HL4614 | HL4615
Asked on: 02 February 2015
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Bates on 19 December (HL3453, HL3455 and HL3456), whether any of the 42 joint protocols between the police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service have any impact in Scotland; and whether any joint protocol has been established between police and prosecution services in England and Wales and in Scotland.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 17 February 2015

The Government is committed to tackling female genital mutilation (FGM). The multi-agency practice guidelines on FGM are designed for application in England
and Wales. The guidelines include a weblink to information on the Scottish Government’s work on FGM.

The 42 joint protocols between the police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service apply in England and Wales only.

The 2007 and 2014 prevalence studies part-funded by the Home Office cover the number of girls and women affected by FGM in England and Wales. The full version of the 2014 study including data disaggregated at a local level in England and Wales will be published shortly.

The Government’s new specialist FGM Unit will work in consultation with partners in Scotland, as appropriate, to ensure a joined up approach to tackling FGM across the UK.

Grouped Questions: HL4613 | HL4615
Asked on: 02 February 2015
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answers by Lord Bates on 19 December (HL3453, HL3455 and HL3456), whether any of the data collected in studies funded by the Home Office covers the whole of the United Kingdom or just England and Wales; and whether any United Kingdom-wide data has been disaggregated for the four nations of the United Kingdom.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 17 February 2015

The Government is committed to tackling female genital mutilation (FGM). The multi-agency practice guidelines on FGM are designed for application in England
and Wales. The guidelines include a weblink to information on the Scottish Government’s work on FGM.

The 42 joint protocols between the police forces and the Crown Prosecution Service apply in England and Wales only.

The 2007 and 2014 prevalence studies part-funded by the Home Office cover the number of girls and women affected by FGM in England and Wales. The full version of the 2014 study including data disaggregated at a local level in England and Wales will be published shortly.

The Government’s new specialist FGM Unit will work in consultation with partners in Scotland, as appropriate, to ensure a joined up approach to tackling FGM across the UK.

Grouped Questions: HL4613 | HL4614
Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 03 February 2015
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Higher Education: Freedom of Expression
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they will take to encourage student unions fully to support freedom of expression on university campuses.
A
Answered by: Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Answered on: 17 February 2015

The Government fully supports freedom of expression on university campuses.

The Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill currently before Parliament proposes new measures to reduce the risk of terrorism; these measures, if agreed, will in turn reduce the threat terrorism poses to freedom of speech in universities and elsewhere.

We encourage Student Unions to actively support freedom of expression on campus. The Government works with the National Union of Students and supports them in tackling those who promote hatred, discrimination or intolerance based on gender, faith or race to ensure that campuses are safe, welcoming environments where free debate and discussion can take place.

Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 03 February 2015
HM Treasury
Tourism: VAT
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have any plans to reduce VAT for tourism.
A
Answered by: Lord Deighton
Answered on: 17 February 2015

The Government currently has no plans to reduce VAT for tourism.

Q
(Birkenhead)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 February 2015
HM Treasury
Welfare Tax Credits
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the average time taken to process changes in household circumstances for existing tax credit claims was in 2014.
A
Answered by: Priti Patel
Answered on: 17 February 2015

The average time taken to process changes in household circumstances for existing UK tax credit claims in 2014 was 11.21 average days.

Q
Asked by Pamela Nash
(Airdrie and Shotts)
Asked on: 03 February 2015
HM Treasury
Inheritance Tax
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many members of HM Revenue and Customs were employed to tackle the issue of inheritance tax avoidance in (a) the UK, (b) Scotland, (c) England, (d) Wales and (e) Northern Ireland in each of the last five years up to the most recent period for which records are available.
A
Answered by: Mr David Gauke
Answered on: 17 February 2015

Inheritance Tax compliance is organised and tackled on a National basis from offices located in Nottingham, Edinburgh and Belfast.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has specialist Inheritance Tax compliance teams. The time spent tackling avoidance by the IHT compliance teams is not separately recorded.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-20 out of 31417
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100