Policy

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what explicit monetary value his Department assigns to the value of preventing a fatality calculation during the process of policy appraisal and evaluation; [203071]

(2) at what level his Department values the reduction of risk of death per fatal casualty prevented; and if he will give an example of policy intervention where this evaluation was made. [203613]

Dr Poulter: The value of a prevented fatality is not normally used in the appraisal of policy or project proposals by the Department. The standard unit of impact for appraisal of projects and policies that have an impact upon mortality or morbidity, including prevention of fatalities, is a statistical life year (SLY), with adjustment for quality of life impacts where appropriate (in which case quality adjusted life years (QALYs) are used). SLYs and QALYs are valued at roughly £60,000. This valuation is consistent with the willingness of members of the public to pay for

7 July 2014 : Column 45W

improvement in health and risk outcomes elicited in the study that underpins the valuation of prevented fatalities by the Department for Transport and other Departments (Carthy T., Chilton S., Covey J., Hopkins L., Jones-Lee M., Loomes G., Pidgeon N., Spencer A., “The Contingent-Valuation of Safety and the Safety of Contingent Valuation, part 2: The CV/SG Chained Approach”, Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 1999, 17: 187-213.)

This valuation of SLYs is used by the Department in its impact assessment of the proposed draft regulations for standardised packaging of tobacco products upon which the Department is currently consulting.

A copy of the impact assessment has been placed in the Library and is available at:

www.gov.uk/government/consultations/standardised-packaging-of-tobacco-products-draft-regulations

Prisons: Mental Health Services

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he is taking to ensure the efficient and timely transfer of prisoners to hospitals under the Mental Health Act 1983; [203451]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of prisoners waiting for more than 14 days for a transfer to hospital under the Mental Health Act 1983. [203454]

Norman Lamb: The implementation of an effective system for the timely transfer of prisoners to hospital is dependent on close working and co-operation between a number of organisations and agencies, including the Department of Health, Ministry of Justice (National Offender Management Service and Her Majesty’s Prison Service), the Home Office in some cases, the national health service and independent sector health providers.

In 2011, the Department updated good practice guidance for the transfer and remission of adult prisoners under sections 47 and 48 of the Mental Health Act 1983. The guidance is available on the gov.uk website:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-transfer-and-remission-of-adult-prisoners-under-s47-and-s48-of-the-mental-health-act

Following the NHS reforms, this is now being updated further by NHS England. NHS England plans to consult on draft guidance this year.

The Ministry of Justice has also published guidance for those working with mentally disordered offenders, including the transfer and remission of prisoners under the Mental Health Act 1983, which is published on its website:

www.justice.gov.uk/offenders/types-of-offender/mentally-disordered-offenders

NHS England collects data on the number of people in England and Wales waiting to be transferred from prison to hospital. The latest data, for quarter 3 of 2013-14, shows that between September and December 2013, 186 people were waiting more than two weeks, from assessment for suitability, to be transferred from prison to hospital.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that prisoners in England receive adequate mental health treatment and support; [203453]

7 July 2014 : Column 46W

(2) if he will commission a survey of the prevalence of mental health problems and learning disabilities among adults and children in the prison population and in other criminal justice settings. [203455]

Norman Lamb: Improving the mental health of offenders is a priority for this Government, as set out in the mental health strategy No Health, Without Mental Health in 2011. We have acted upon the recommendations of Lord Bradley’s review, published in 2009, of people with mental health problems and learning disabilities in the criminal justice system, to ensure that people in prison have the same access to mental health services as the rest of population. The review also recommended the development of liaison and diversion services nationally, the national liaison and diversion programme is currently trialling an all age service model with the intention of national roll-out by 2017.

The Government’s Mandate commits NHS England to develop better health care services for offenders and people in the criminal justice system, which are integrated between custody and the community, including through development of liaison and diversion services.

We have also asked the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to develop guidelines on improving the mental health for people in prison, which is expected to be published in 2016.

NHS England is responsible for commissioning health services, including mental health services, for people who are detained in prison or other secure accommodation. NHS England published Securing Excellence in Commissioning for Offender Health, which sets out its commissioning intentions to secure the best possible health outcomes for prisoners, detainees and children and young people in secure settings. This document is published on NHS England’s website:

www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/offender-commissioning.pdf

NHS England, the National Offender Management Service and Public Health England established a national partnership agreement for the co-commissioning and delivery of health care services in prisons in England. The partnership agreement sets out the shared strategic intent and joint commitment of these organisations to deliver effective health care for offenders and improving health outcomes and reducing inequalities. A copy of the partnership agreement is published on the National Offender Management Service’s website:

www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/about/noms/work-with-partners/national-partnership-agreement-commissioning-delivery-healthcare-prisons2013.pdf

The Department commissioned the Office for National Statistics in 1997 to conduct a survey of the prevalence of psychiatric problems in prison. There are no plans to commission a further survey.

The Liaison and Diversion programme has recently commissioned an evaluation of liaison and diversion services. The implementation of improved screening as part of these services will provide a level of information on offender health needs within that evaluation.

Spectacles

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he expects the new Symfony Lens to be available on the NHS as an alternative to glasses. [203228]

7 July 2014 : Column 47W

Dr Poulter: The Department's view is that spectacles or contact lenses can satisfactorily correct almost all refractory errors in a safe, cost-effective way.

Clinical commissioning groups have the discretion to pay for a multi-focal lens on the national health service if it is judged clinically necessary for an individual patient.

Strokes

Crispin Blunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will request that the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence examines the use of Sativex or other appropriate cannabis derivatives for treatment of spasticity due to stroke. [203015]

Norman Lamb: Sativex (nabiximols) does not have a marketing authorisation for use in the treatment of spasticity due to stroke and there are no current plans to ask the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to issue guidance on the drug or other cannabis derivatives for this indication.

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will institute a campaign to raise public awareness of the symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack and the need for urgent treatment; and if he will make a statement. [203602]

Jane Ellison: There are no plans for any specific marketing activity around raising public awareness of transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs).

However, Public Health England continues to run the highly impactful Act FAST stroke awareness campaign that covers very similar signs with a message to call 999 if these signs are witnessed. Two new television executions ran in March 2014 with plans to run them again later in the current financial year.

NHS England produced a resource for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to support them in setting and delivering on a level of ambition to reduce premature mortality. The resource included information on high-impact interventions that CCGs could consider commissioning to reduce premature mortality. One of these is to increase the proportion of patients with TIA treated within 24 hours from 71% to 100%.

The resource is available here:

www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/sop/red-prem-mort/

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research he has commissioned into the effect of ensuring that patients receive urgent treatment following a transient ischaemic attack on (a) reducing the risk of stroke and (b) reducing the cost to the NHS of treating strokes. [203603]

Jane Ellison: The Department has not commissioned any recent research on these specific topics. Funding from the Department’s National Institute for Health Research has supported the EXPRESS (Early use of eXisting PREventive Strategies for Stroke) study, which aimed to measure the effect or more rapid treatment after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke in patients who were not admitted directly to hospital.

7 July 2014 : Column 48W

Evidence from the EXPRESS study has informed advice on TIA services set out in the “Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Strategy” published last year.

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that examples of good practice and better care pathways for the treatment of transient ischaemic attacks are disseminated throughout the NHS. [203604]

Jane Ellison: The Strategic Clinical Networks (SCNs) bring together clinicians from across health care settings and the wider health and care system in 12 geographic areas across England. The SCNs share best practice and promote initiatives around their core service areas which include cardiovascular disease (renal disease, diabetes, cardiac disease and stroke, including transient ischaemic attacks). The SCNs hold regular meetings to enable communication and information sharing.

Tuberculosis

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to reduce the number of cases of TB in (a) London and (b) England. [203049]

Jane Ellison: In 2012 in the United Kingdom, a total of 8,751 cases of tuberculosis (TB) were reported, a rate of 13.9 cases per 100,000 population. In 2011, 8,899 TB cases were reported in the UK (rate: 14.1/100,000 population), and 8,397 TB cases were reported in 2010, a rate of 13.5 per 100,000 population.

In the UK, the main burden of TB is concentrated in large urban areas; in 2012, London had the highest proportion of cases (39%) followed by West Midlands (12%).

The Department recognises the public health importance of TB, particularly among groups at higher risk of TB, such as migrants from high incidence countries and persons with social risk factors, such as homelessness, imprisonment and drug and alcohol use in England and within large metropolitan areas, like London.

We also recognise the contribution that latent TB infection (LTBI) makes to the overall TB disease burden. Systematic LTBI testing and treatment is part of the recommendation in the current TB guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE, 2011) and are a key intervention in the draft collaborative TB strategy for England, being led by Public Health England (PHE).

The Department is also concerned about the high TB rates in persons with social risk factors, which is why it commissioned NICE to produce a short clinical guidance on TB services for underserved groups. The guidance makes clear recommendations for active case finding and other interventions in these groups (published in March 2012). The Department is funding research projects on identifying latent TB in relation to the effectiveness of testing for latent TB and on the prognostic value of these tests to predict the progression from latent to active TB.

7 July 2014 : Column 49W

PHE has made TB one of its main priorities, and is leading a coalition of key stakeholders, including the Department, NHS England, Local Government and other key public and voluntary organisations, to develop a national TB strategy.

The strategy aims to bring together best practice in clinical care, social support and public health to strengthen TB control, leading to a year on year decrease in incidence, a reduction in health inequalities associated with TB, and to contribute to the eventual elimination of the disease.

The consultation process for the formulation of the strategy started in March 2014 and ended in June 2014. The strategy will be launched sometime in the autumn 2014.

The following link is for the TB Strategy consultation, which provides useful information on introducing TB controls in England:

www.hpa.org.uk/webc/HPAwebFile/HPAweb_C/1317140970182

In London, a London TB Control Board has been constituted with representation from all agencies involved in preventing, controlling and treating TB, to try and replicate the progress made in other major international cities such as New York and Paris.

Valuation of Life and Health Interdepartmental Group

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what monetary thresholds were applied to the cost-per-quality adjusted life year quoted in the evidence submitted as part of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review in 2008; [203081]

(2) what measures of the value of life and health were included in the evidence submitted as part of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review; [203072]

(3) what measures of the value of life and health were included in the evidence submitted as part of his Department's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review; [203073]

(4) what measures of the value of life and health were included in the evidence submitted as part of the Health Protection Agency's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review; [203074]

(5) what measures of the value of life and health were included in the evidence submitted as part of the Food Standards Agency's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review in 2008. [203079]

Dr Poulter: I refer my right hon. Friend to the answer given on 26 June 2014, Official Report, column 283W.

The focus of the work of the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health has been methodological rather than upon specific measures of value. It has focused upon the appropriate units for the measurement of impacts on life and health risks in different circumstances, and the methodology to be applied to valuation of those units in different contexts. Nevertheless, as a spur to the methodological investigation,

7 July 2014 : Column 50W

an initial survey of monetary valuations of various units of impact by different departments and agencies including case studies was undertaken. This was conducted by the Institute of Transport Studies at the University of Leeds and compiled into a “Survey of the Value of Life/ Health used in Government Departments”, which has been placed in the Library. In addition, the Health and Safety Executive and the Department for Transport have already placed in the Library their members’ responses to the ITS survey.

Development of monetary thresholds to be applied to the cost-per-quality adjusted life year is not within the remit of the Group.

York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients had been waiting for (a) over six months and (b) three months for in-patient admission at York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust in March 1997 and in each year since. [202887]

Jane Ellison: Information is not available in the format requested. Information on the number of patients waiting over six months and three months for in-patient admission at what is now York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust from March 1997 to March 2010 is shown in the following table.

Since 2007, waiting times on a referral to treatment (RTT) basis have been published. Information on the number of patients who waited over six months and over three months on an admitted RTT pathway at York Teaching Hospital NHS FT between March 2008 and March 2012 is shown in the following table.

Organisation1Six monthsThree months

1997 York Health Services NHS Trust

1,317

3,138

1998 York Health Services NHS Trust

2,744

4,651

1999 York Health Services NHS Trust

1,641

3,368

2000 York Health Services NHS Trust

1,752

3,540

2001 York Health Services NHS Trust

1,884

3,488

2002 York Health Services NHS Trust

1,900

3,697

2003 York Health Services NHS Trust

1,7H

3,416

2004 York Health Services NHS Trust

826

2,542

2005 York Health Services NHS Trust

532

2,076

2006 York Health Services NHS Trust

0

1,490

2007 York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (FT)

0

606

2008 York Hospitals NHS FT

0

227

2009 York Hospitals NHS FT

0

298

2010 York Hospitals NHS FT

0

132

1As at March each year. Note: Data on in-patient waiting lists not collected after March 2010. Source: Department of Health KH07 from March 1992 to March 2007 and MMRProv (monthly monitoring return) from March 2008 to March 2010.
Organisation1Six monthsThree months

2008 York Hospitals NHS FT

42

413

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2009 York Hospitals NHS FT

46

529

2010 York Hospitals NHS FT

44

449

2011 York Teaching Hospital NHS FT

38

530

2012 York Teaching Hospital NHS FT

119

736

2013 York Teaching Hospital NHS FT

89

864

2014 York Teaching Hospital NHS FT

277

1,178

1 As at March each year. Source: Department of Health monthly RTT return.

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients were waiting for elective admission at York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust on 1 April in 1996 and in each year since. [202888]

Jane Ellison: The number of patients waiting for elective admission at York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust for each year between March 1996 and March 2010 is shown in the following table:

Ending March each year:Number waiting at period end

1996

6,081

1997

6,846

1998

8,445

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1999

6,715

2000

6,477

2001

6,317

2002

6,354

2003

6,425

2004

5,714

2005

5,211

2006

4,738

2007

3,055

2008

2,536

2009

2,675

2010

2,336

Note: Data on in-patient waiting lists not collected after March 2010. Source: Department of Health KH07, Monthly monitoring return

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the mean and median waiting time was for treatment at accident and emergency in York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in 2007-08 and in each year since. [202889]

Jane Ellison: The following table shows the mean and median waiting times for assessment, treatment, and departure at accident and emergency departments at York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.

 Mean duration to assessmentMedian duration to assessmentMean duration to treatmentMedian duration to treatmentMean duration to departureMedian duration to departure

2007-08

23.3

17

23.1

17

120.0

102

2008-09

24.1

17

24.0

17

116.0

99

2009-10

27.1

19

26.8

19

112.7

100

2010-11

30.9

22

30.5

22

118.0

105

2011-12

24.8

15

55.7

39

95.0

77

2012-13

17.2

5

45.0

26

111.8

88

Notes: 1. Duration to Assessment The total amount of time in minutes between the patient’s arrival and their initial assessment in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department. This is calculated as the difference in time from arrival at A&E to the time when the patient is initially assessed. 2. Duration to Treatment The total amount of time in minutes between the patient’s arrival and the start of their treatment. This is calculated as the difference in time from arrival at A&E to the time when the patient began treatment. 3. Duration to Departure The total amount of time spent in minutes in the A&E department. This is calculated as the difference in time from arrival at A&E to the time when the patient is discharged from A&E care. This includes being admitted to hospital, died in the department, discharged with no follow up or discharged—referred to another specialist department. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients were waiting for a first out-patient appointment at York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust on 1 April and 1 October in 2004 and on the same dates in each year since. [202890]

Jane Ellison: Information is not available in the format requested. The number of patients waiting for a first out-patient appointment at York Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust on 1 April and 1 October in each year since 2004 are shown in the following table:

Month ending:Number waiting at period end

September 2004

4,800

March 2005

7,697

September 2005

7,644

March 2006

5,530

September 2006

4,416

March 2007

2,728

September 2007

3,423

March 2008

2,237

September 2008

2,311

March 2009

2,067

September 2009

1,987

March 2010

1,602

Notes: 1. Out-patient waiting times are measured from general practitioner referral to first out-patient appointment. 2. Figures first published June 2004 and last published March 2010. Source: Department of Health QM08, monthly monitoring return.

7 July 2014 : Column 53W

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many finished consultant episodes there were at York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in each year since 2008-09 and in each year since. [202897]

Jane Ellison: The information requested is shown in the following table:

Count of finished consultant episodes1 where the provider was York Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, for the years 2008-09 to 2012-132
 FCEs

2008-09

87,023

2009-10

91,528

2010-11

97,719

2011-12

103,847

2012-13

164,691

1Finished consultant episode (FCE) A FCE is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year. 2Assessing growth through time (admitted patient care) Hospital Episode Statistics figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years) and changes in national health service practice. For example, changes in activity may be due to changes in the provision of care. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre.

Home Department

Cyber-attacks

Chris Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the preparedness of the police to respond to a cyber-attack. [904651]

Karen Bradley: The Government takes the threat of cyber attack seriously. Last year we created the National Cyber Crime Unit in the National Crime Agency, to lead the national response to cyber crime. We are also investing in the cyber teams in Regional Organised Crime Units, and training police officers in local forces, to ensure we are fully equipped to tackle cyber attacks at every level. And we are strengthening the Computer Misuse Act to ensure that the punishments available to prosecute cyber criminals fit the crime.

Animal Experiments

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will bring forward legislative proposals to make the homing of cats, dogs and other animals no longer required for experimentation a mandatory requirement for laboratories. [203184]

Norman Baker: There are no legislative proposals to make the homing of cats, dogs and other animals no longer required for experimentation a mandatory requirement for laboratories.

European directive 2010/63/EU, which was implemented in the UK and other member states on 1 January 2013, sets out the conditions under which animals may be re-homed in article 19. These provisions are reflected in our Guidance on the Operation of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1983, section 5.21.

7 July 2014 : Column 54W

Asylum

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the report by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, Inspection of the UK Border Agency's handling of legacy asylum and migration cases, published in November 2012, what steps have been taken in response to recommendation 1 of that report. [202745]

Karen Bradley: The Older Live Cases Unit routinely and regularly matches asylum and migration legacy cases against the Police National Computer (PNC) and Warnings Index (WI) records, until the point at which cases are finally concluded. The checks are undertaken on a rolling three monthly basis. Results are recorded on a bespoke database which informs the decision-making process within the Older Live Cases Unit.

Compliance with the recommendation was acknowledged by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration in his report, An investigation into the progress made on legacy asylum and migration cases January-March 2013, published in June 2013, where he stated, “security checks had been completed in each of the cases we sampled (144), indicating that the agency had implemented our earlier recommendation to routinely and regularly match legacy cases against the PNC and WI until finally concluded.”

Asylum: Children

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the report by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, Inspection into the Handling of Asylum Applications made by Unaccompanied Children, published in October 2013, what steps have been taken in response to recommendations 1, 3, 4 and 8 of that report. [202744]

James Brokenshire: In response to recommendation 1, a clear and consistent approach has been adopted. A pilot was run shortly after the inspection that led to the adoption of a new screening process for unaccompanied children; this has led to increased consistency between the Home Office and local authorities. All initial screenings take place within five days of initial claim. Local authorities are clearly responsible for facilitating the access to legal advice and responsible adults prior to the screening interview.

In response to recommendation 3, this guidance and policy has been reinforced locally. The Asylum Casework Directorate has implemented new structures that offer better technical support for promoting and monitoring family tracing. This guidance has been reinforced locally in all teams through the creation of specialised family and minors teams in each regional location. Work is ongoing with the Foreign Office on new family tracing arrangements for volume UASC nationalities (Albanian and Afghan) that should help to expedite the tracing process in these countries. The practicality of specialised teams will be reviewed once all decision units are fully staffed.

In response to recommendation 4, the move to a single national directorate has led to greater consistency and control of asylum case work. This has helped to address the consistency of operations and outcomes in

7 July 2014 : Column 55W

each of the seven casework locations. Customer service standards have been reviewed with the expectation that straightforward claims can expect to receive their decision within six months. Unaccompanied children should receive their decisions quicker than that.

In response to recommendation 8, as part of the ongoing continuous improvement programme decision letters have been reviewed and changed. Templates are now clearer, more concise and customer friendly. This new approach to producing more concise grant letters and minutes has been implemented while a pilot regarding refusal letters is under way.

Commonwealth Games 2014

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will take steps to ensure that participants in the Glasgow Commonwealth Games 2014 are prevented from staying in the UK illegally after the Games have finished. [202835]

Karen Bradley: The rigorous Accreditation Process that contributed to the success of the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012 has also been central to our preparations for Glasgow 2014.

To minimise attempts to abuse our hospitality after the Games have ended, comprehensive record checks on all Commonwealth Games participants and Games Family Members are conducted before they are cleared to enter the UK. We have also introduced arrangements to confirm that people given Commonwealth Games clearance have left the UK within their permitted time limits.

Cybercrime

Mr Steve Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made by the Cyber Crime Reduction Partnership over the last 12 months; and if she will make a statement. [202611]

Karen Bradley: The UK Cyber Security Strategy, which includes a commitment to develop a partnership group with industry on cybercrime, was published in November 2011.

The Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude), gave the second annual report on progress against objectives set out in the strategy on 12 December 2013, Official Report, columns 43-47WS. The Minister for the Cabinet Office also placed before Parliament a list of achievements over the preceding year and a document that outlines its future plans. The documents can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-cyber-security-strategy-2-years-on

The partnership, one of a set of engagement points with industry on cyber-security, provides an opportunity to raise awareness of cybercrime among members, helping them to become more resilient to the threat. To date, it has provided a forum for partners to share views on key changes to the law enforcement landscape on cyber and contribute to key actions in the strategy. This includes work to co-ordinate cyber-security messages to the private sector.

7 July 2014 : Column 56W

Educational Testing Service

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department at which main institutions the student immigrants who were found to have either invalid or questionable English language test results by the Government's recent review of the test provider Educational Testing Services intended to extend their studies. [203035]

James Brokenshire: Following the review of English language test results provided by Educational Testing Service test centres, on 24 June the Home Office took action against 60 institutions that sponsored students with invalid or questionable test results. The list of sponsors against whom action was taken was placed in the Library of the House on that day and was also published on the Gov.uk website as part of a “Home office immigration action against education institutions: factsheet”:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/323106/sponsor-suspensions.pdf

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the main nationalities were of the student immigrants who were found to have either invalid or questionable English language test results by the Government's recent review of the test provider Educational Testing Services. [203036]

James Brokenshire: As I stated in my oral statement to Parliament on 24 June 2014, Official Report, columns 206-08, analysis is being provided by the American arm of Educational Testing Service (ETS) on those with invalid or questionable results. Analysis is on-going and it is not possible to provide data on nationality at present. As I stated to the House on 24 June, the Home Office will provide regular updates to the House on progress with work to remove these students and on further information we receive from ETS.

HM Passport Office

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people employed by HM Passport Office were specifically tasked with processing passport applications on 1 January, (a) 2011, (b) 2012, (c) 2013 and (d) 2014. [200369]

James Brokenshire: The table shows the number of Her Majesty's Passport Office full-time equivalents working within the passport operational Directorates.

The formal record for workforce data is made on the last day of each calendar month. We have therefore provided the data as of 31 December of each year.

 Number

(a) 2011

2,360

(b) 2012

2,265

(c) 2013

2,457

Due to the limitations of the HR management system used prior to December 2010, it is not possible to provide reliable management information below top level for any periods prior to that date.

7 July 2014 : Column 57W

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people employed by HM Passport Office were specifically tasked with processing passport applications on (a) 1 January, (b) 1 February, (c) 1 March, (d) 1 April, (e) 1 May and (f) 1 June 2014. [200370]

James Brokenshire: The formal record for workforce data is made on the last day of each calendar month.

The following table shows the number of Her Majesty's Passport Office full-time equivalents working within the passport operational Directorates.

 Number

(a) On 31 December 2013

2,457

(b) On 31 January 2014

2,515

(c) On 28 February 2014

2,559

(d) On 31 March 2014

2,593

(e) On 30 April 2014

2,611

(f) On 31 May 2014

2,629

Note: Her Majesty's Passport Office records migrated to the Department’s strategic record system during this period and are subject to enhanced validation checks. Several months in this time series have a variance of +/- 2 FTE.

Pete Wishart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the savings generated by closing passport offices in the last five years; and what estimate she has made of the total cost of (a) cancelled and (b) altered flights due to delayed passport applications in 2014. [201357]

James Brokenshire: No passport offices have been closed in the last five years.

Restructuring of passport operations between 2010 and 2012 entailed the closure of some interview offices and relocation of the Newport passport office. These changes realised annual savings of approximately £7.2 million per year.

We do not collect data on the costs of cancelled and altered flights.

Mike Thornton: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps her Department is taking to ensure that the information given to passport applicants through the 0300 passport helpline is current and in real time. [201863]

James Brokenshire: Her Majesty's Passport Office regularly reviews the guidance issued to the helpline provider, and updates it to reflect any changes in processes or customer requirements.

Information on the progress of applications can be provided from information that is either live or updated daily, dependent on the nature of the inquiry.

Human Trafficking: Albania

Graham Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to her answer of 16 June 2014, Official Report, column 441W, on human trafficking: Albania, how many female victims of trafficking have returned from England using the International Organisation for Migration voluntary return package and taken up the facilities made available by the government in Albania; and if she will make a statement. [202513]

7 July 2014 : Column 58W

James Brokenshire: In November 2013, the UK Government and the Albanian Government, working with the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), established a voluntary return package for female victims of trafficking who wished to return to Albania. This comprehensive package includes the provision of secure accommodation in Albania (with guards and social services on site), child care assistance where required, and training or support to establish a business or enter the labour market. This provides the high level of support and assistance required for victims who wish to return to Albania to rebuild their lives. Although no victims have yet availed themselves of the package, a number of potential cases have been identified and the Home Office is actively working with the Albanian Government, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and IOM to improve the promotion of the scheme among those who may qualify and identify and address any perceived barriers to return.

Human Trafficking: Children

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will bring forward legislative proposals to recognise child trafficking as a separate offence to adult trafficking. [202633]

Karen Bradley: The most effective way to protect child victims of trafficking is to have a general offence, which applies to both adults and children. The Modern Slavery Bill contains a general human trafficking offence, which does not require prosecutors to prove the age of the child, as this can lead to practical problems during prosecutions. Targeting a child will, however, be an aggravating factor for sentencing purposes, and the human trafficking offence in the Modern Slavery Bill will carry a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions she has had with the Attorney General on her policy in relation to the prosecution of child victims of trafficking who are forced to commit crimes. [203000]

Karen Bradley: The Modern Slavery Bill provides for a statutory defence for victims of slavery and trafficking who have been compelled to commit an offence as direct result of their trafficking or slavery situation. In preparing the Bill, I have had discussions with ministerial colleagues including with the Attorney-General in relation to the statutory defence.

When considering whether the defence applies, the age, sex and any physical or mental illness or disability of the victim is relevant under the test set out in the Bill.

Members: Correspondence

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will estimate the total number of ministerial replies from her Department to hon. Members in a parliamentary session; and what proportion of such replies are sent (a) by letter and (b) by email. [203307]

Karen Bradley: The total number of ministerial replies sent to hon. Members between 1 January and 31 December 2013 was 56,193. This figure includes replies sent by

7 July 2014 : Column 59W

letter or email. We do not collect information centrally on the volumes of responses provided by email and it could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Simon Kirby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans her Department has to increase the number of replies sent electronically to letters from hon. Members. [203530]

Karen Bradley: The Government’s digital strategy details the approach we will take to evolve our service provision. Where the Home Office receives high volumes of correspondence from MPs, such as on immigration matters, we work proactively with MPs and their caseworkers to provide them with the most efficient and convenient service and encourage increasing use of emails and telephones as channels of communication.

Nazi War Crimes

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many investigations have been carried out by Scotland Yard since 1984 on suspected individuals involved in crimes by the SS in the Second World War. [203227]

Damian Green: The Home Office does not hold this information.

Organised Crime

Sir Edward Leigh: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effect of serious and organised crime on communities. [904663]

Mrs May: The Government takes the threat of cyber attack seriously. Last year we created the National Cyber Crime Unit in the National Crime Agency, to lead the national response to cyber crime. We are also investing in the cyber teams in Regional Organised Crime Units, and training police officers in local forces, to ensure we are fully equipped to tackle cyber attacks at every level. And we are strengthening the Computer Misuse Act to ensure that the punishments available to prosecute cyber criminals fit the crime.

Passports

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the average waiting time for people (a) applying for a passport renewal and (b) waiting for a call back from the Passport Office. [199574]

James Brokenshire: The information requested is as follows:

(a) Expected service standards for passport renewals are published at:

https://www.gov.uk

(b) The current guideline for returning calls to customers is to do so within 48 hours. Her Majesty's Passport Office gives priority to those with the most immediate travel plans.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had with the Passport Office about the updating of advice

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on timescales during busy periods for

(a)

the renewal of a passport and

(b)

the time it will take for staff to call an applicant back. [199578]

James Brokenshire: Ministers have held frequent recent discussions with Her Majesty's Passport Office.

Current advice for customers on expected service standards is published on:

https://www.gov.uk

The current guideline for returning calls to customers is to do so within 48 hours. Her Majesty's Passport Office gives priority to those with the most immediate travel plans.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent reports she has received of changes in the backlog for processing (a) new passport applications and (b) passport renewals. [200256]

James Brokenshire: Ministers receive regular reports on the performance of Her Majesty's Passport Office.

Mr Godsiff: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will make it her policy to compensate people who have paid for an upgrade in their passport application as a result of delays in processing their original application. [200689]

James Brokenshire: Anyone who needs to travel within the next seven days and who has waited longer than the standard processing time of three weeks, through no fault of their own, will be able to upgrade their application without charge. After their application has been through the proper checks, the processing, printing and delivery of the new passport will be fast-tracked for free. This policy was announced by the Secretary of State for the Home Department to the House of Commons on 12 June and will not be applied retrospectively.

HM Passport Office's policy on compensation is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/compensation-and-complaints-handling

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of applicants who have upgraded to a premium service following contact with the Passport Office in each of the last 12 months for which figures are available. [200717]

James Brokenshire: The table below shows the number of people who have upgraded from a standard to a premium service.

 Number of upgrades

January 2014

6

February 2014

17

March 2014

117

April 2014

996

May 2014

1,024

The specific information required is held in application ‘case notes’ on Her Majesty’s Passport Office systems which cannot be mined through database queries. Data presented here is an estimate for 2014.

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Information on the number of upgrades prior to January 2014 has not been collated centrally.

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations she has received from the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on the processing of passport applications from abroad since 1 January 2014. [200813]

James Brokenshire: Home Office Ministers have regular discussions with ministerial colleagues and others. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government’s practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Mr McKenzie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will make it her policy to reimburse people who have had to pay to upgrade to the premium one-day service to secure a (a) new or (b) renewed passport; and if she will make a statement. [201055]

James Brokenshire: There are no plans to reimburse customers who choose to use the four hour premium service.

On 12 June 2014, Official Report, column 693, the Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right hon. Friend the Member for Maidenhead (Mrs May), announced in the House of Commons that where people have an urgent need to travel, and their application has been with Her Majesty's Passport Office for longer than the standard processing time of three weeks through no fault of their own, they will be able to upgrade their application without charge. After their application has been through the proper checks, the processing, printing and delivery of the new passport will be fast-tracked for free. To qualify, customers must be booked to travel within the next seven days. Customers will be asked to provide details—such as flight numbers and the name of the travel company—to confirm their travel plans.

This policy came into effect immediately after being announced and will be available until further notice. This policy will not be applied retrospectively.

Passports: Scotland

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people resident in Scotland were issued with passports for (a) collection and (b) interviews at offices outside of Scotland in each of the last four years for which records are most recent. [201807]

James Brokenshire: Her Majesty's Passport Office does not hold this information broken down by residency of applicant. The cost of providing it from individual applicant data would be disproportionate.

Passports: Welsh Language

Hywel Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has to ensure that Welsh language service provisions are maintained whilst her Department clears the passport applications backlog. [202193]

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James Brokenshire: Her Majesty's Passport Office has a number of policies and provisions in place to ensure customers can communicate with Her Majesty's Passport Office in Welsh.

We work closely with the Office of the Welsh Language Commissioner to ensure that we offer quality services in line with the Welsh Language Act 1993.

Raytheon

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what financial provision her Department has made to cover the (a) ongoing legal costs of and (b) costs of a potential settlement resulting from the binding arbitration process brought by Raytheon Systems Ltd. [202733]

Karen Bradley: Ongoing legal costs will be met from departmental resources, although no specific financial provision has been made for this or for the costs of a potential settlement. The costs of a potential settlement have been recognised as a contingent liability in the Home Office accounts since 2011-12.

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress her Department has made on reaching a settlement with Raytheon Systems Ltd on the e-Borders programme; and when the arbitration progress is scheduled to be completed. [202833]

Karen Bradley: The Home Office would like the dispute with Raytheon to be concluded as swiftly as possible. It is not unusual that an international arbitration of this complexity should take a considerable time to resolve. The Home Office has done everything possible to progress the Arbitration as quickly as possible. The evidential hearings concluded in April 2013.

UK Border Agency

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost was of running (a) the Case Resolution Directorate, (b) the Case Assurance and Audit Unit and (c) the Older Live Cases Unit in each year of those bodies' operations. [202312]

Karen Bradley: The operational costs of running the Case Resolution Directorate (excluding enforcement costs, detention and removal escort costs or asylum and immigration tribunal costs) was approximately £32 million per year. The costs are inclusive of an outsourced administrative function in 2009-11. Support costs for applicants were accounted for separately for this period.

The total running costs of the Case Assurance and Audit Unit was £27.4 million (2011-12) and £19.5million (2012-13). The total running costs of the Older Live Cases Unit was £7.8 million (2013-14). The Older Live Cases Unit budget spend to date for 2014-15 is £1.87 million. Since setting up the Case Resolution Directorate, operational running costs have decreased year on year.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the report by the Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration,

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Investigation into the Establishment of the Performance and Compliance Unit, published in May 2013, what steps have been taken in response to recommendation 1 of that report. [202743]

James Brokenshire: Following the reorganisations which flowed from the decision to bring the functions of the UK Border Agency back into direct ministerial control, the Performance and Compliance Unit no longer exists.

Valuation of Life and Health Interdepartmental Group

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the explicit monetary value per quality-adjusted life was in the context of homicide and crime categories of wounding, sexual offences, common assault and robbery, as quoted as part of her Department’s submission to the Inter-Departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review in 2008; [202423]

(2) if she will place in the Library a copy of her Department’s submission to the Inter-Departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review and all evidence submitted to the series of interviews with her Department’s staff conducted by researchers from the university of Leeds in 2008. [202415]

Norman Baker: A copy of the Home Office’s written response to the 2008 Survey of Departmental Practice in the Valuation of Life and Health will be placed in the Library. The Home Office does not have a record of its response to the questions in stage 2 of the survey. This is because the interviews were carried out face-to-face with researchers at the university of Leeds.

The Home Office first estimated the social and economic costs of crime in 2000, available at:

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110218135832/rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs/hors217.pdf

The most recent update to these estimates prior to the Department’s submission to the Inter-Departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review in 2008 was published in 2005, available at:

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20100413151441/http:/www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs05/rdsolr3005.pdf

The monetary value per quality-adjusted life year used in the 2005 report was £80,620 in 2003 prices. This was based on a paper by Carthy et al. (1999).

Energy and Climate Change

Climate Change: Northern Ireland

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions his Department has had with bodies in Northern Ireland on addressing climate change. [203054]

Gregory Barker: Ministers and officials in the Department engage with their counterparts regularly in the Northern Ireland Executive on a wide range of issues including work related to the transition to a low carbon economy and tackling climate change. This includes, for example, discussions with the Northern Ireland Executive on the Electricity Market Reform programme, which is designed to decarbonise our electricity generation, and updating

7 July 2014 : Column 64W

them on international climate change policy developments, such as United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations.

Dungeness B Power Station

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment his Department has made of the application by EDF Energy to relax safety limits at Dungeness nuclear power station. [203044]

Michael Fallon: The application by EDF Energy regarding safety limits in its safety case at Dungeness B is a regulatory matter and therefore taken forward by the independent nuclear regulator, the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR), which reviews such arrangements set out in safety cases.

I understand that EDF Energy Nuclear Generation Ltd submitted a revised safety case to ONR to demonstrate that safety would be maintained at Dungeness B as a result of their proposals to revise the safety limits for allowable graphite weight loss in the reactor cores, and that ONR was satisfied that the justifications in the revised safety case demonstrated that the licensee’s obligations to ensure safety would be met.

Electricity

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 19 June 2014, Official Report, column 1258, on energy security, on which process he calculated that there has been £45 billion of electricity investment since 2010. [203378]

Michael Fallon: The estimate of more than £45 billion of electricity infrastructure investment between 2010 and 2013 is calculated by DECC based on modelling consistent with the EMR Delivery Plan.

The modelling suggests that since 2010, over £30 billion has been invested in electricity generation capacity, principally in renewable technologies. In addition, since 2010, more than £16 billion of investment has been made in electricity transmission and distribution.

Generation capacity investment levels are determined by multiplying capacity changes by a technology specific capital cost per unit of capacity value, which varies over time. A project’s total investment cost is profiled over its construction lifetime, with total annual investment levels reflecting the sum of investment in that year across all technology types. All data on costs and profiles is taken from DECC’s Electricity Generation Costs dataset.

Onshore and offshore transmission network investment estimates come from National Grid’s networks module that has been added to DECC’s dispatch model as part of the EMR Delivery Plan analysis.1 Network investment for onshore transmission owners is based on additions to network owners’ regulated asset value under the price control periods consistent with National Grid’s Gone Green scenario. From 2013 onwards Gone Green investment estimates are adjusted for different uptake of technologies in DECC’s dispatch modelling.

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Network investment for offshore transmission is calculated by using a relevant cost associated with Offshore Transmission Owners (OFTOs) based on an average cost per kW for known projects. This is multiplied by offshore wind capacity built.

Investment in distribution networks is based on additions to network owners’ regulated asset value under the DPCR5 price control period.

Further detail on DECC’s Electricity Generation Costs is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/decc-electricity-generation-costs-2013

1 Find further detail in the National Grid report:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/267614/Annex_D_-_National_Grid_EMR_Report.pdf

Energy

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the evidential basis is for the statement in paragraph 2.1 of his departmental annual report 2013-14, HC9, published on 26 June 2014, that investment in cleaner energy infrastructure will help support up to 250,000 jobs by 2020. [203357]

Michael Fallon: We estimate that investment in new, cleaner energy infrastructure through the government’s Electricity Market Reforms will help support up to 250,000 jobs by 2020. This reflects estimates of how many jobs could be supported by electricity generated using renewable, nuclear, and carbon capture and storage technologies, and includes jobs in the relevant supply chains.

In nuclear energy, we estimate there will be between 69,000 and 81,000 jobs by 2020. This is made up of 29,000-41,000 jobs across the nuclear supply chain at the peak of construction activity, from the 16GW of new build capacity industry is planning to build by 2030, in addition to the 40,000 people currently employed in nuclear energy.1

We also estimate that up to 200,000 jobs could be supported in renewable electricity by 2020. This estimate is based on the Renewable Energy Association’s estimate of employment in the sector in 2012-132, and a range of possible deployment levels in 2020 as set out in the Government’s Electricity Market Reform Delivery Plan.3

Within the carbon capture and storage sector, we estimate that around 8,000 jobs could be supported in the early stages of deployment by 2020.4

1 The Economic Benefits of the UK’s Nuclear Supply Chain Capabilities, Oxford Economics, 2013 (A report commissioned for DECC)

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/168017/bis-13-633-the-economic-benefit-of-improving-the-uk-nuclear-supply-chain-capabilities.pdf

2 REVIEW-Renewable Energy View 2013, Renewable Energy Association, April 2014

http://www.r-e-a.net/resources/rea-publications

3 EMR Delivery Plan, DECC, 2013

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/electricity-market-reform-delivery-plan

7 July 2014 : Column 66W

4 DECC estimate DECC estimate based on AEA analysis-Assessing the domestic supply chain barriers to the commercial deployment of carbon capture and storage within the power sector (2013).

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/assessing-the-domestic-supply-chain-barriers-to-the-commercial-deployment-of-carbon-capture-and-storage-within-the-power-sector

Energy Companies Obligation

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the average saving on energy bills for households that have received measures under the Energy Company Obligation. [203366]

Gregory Barker: The Department has not estimated the average savings on energy bills for households that have received measures specifically under the Energy Company Obligation. The saving on energy bills will depend on several factors including the particular measure installed, energy prices and household characteristics that affect their energy consumption.

However, more generally, DECC has estimated that households can save from around £25 to £270 or more per installation per year from installing the main insulation measures (e.g. loft, cavity and solid wall). This is based on estimated energy savings from an illustrative three bedroom semi-detached house (see 2012 Final Green Deal and ECO IA for details):

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/42984/5533-final-stage-impact-assessment-for-the-green-deal-a.pdf

Energy: Prices

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he is taking to reduce consumer energy prices in-line with changes in the wholesale market prices. [203217]

Michael Fallon: In a competitive market, pricing decisions are a commercial matter for companies.

Consumers can put pressure on companies to reduce prices by switching to the best deal for them-Ofgem's Retail Market Reforms to deliver a simpler, clear market combined with Government's push to significantly reduce switching times and require suppliers to share consumer data with trusted third parties, should make this easier to do.

The Government supported Ofgem's recent move to write to the largest suppliers, challenging them to explain to consumers the impact of falling wholesale prices on their retail prices. Evidence that large suppliers raise prices more quickly when costs increase than they reduce prices when costs fall was one of the issues underpinning Ofgem's recent referral of the energy markets to the Competition and Markets Authority.

Fuel Poverty

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) what estimate his Department has made of the number of households who will receive assistance under (a) affordable warmth, (b) carbon savings community and (c) carbon saving target in (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17; [203283]

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(2) what estimate his Department has made of the number of measures to be installed under (a) affordable warmth, (b) carbon savings community and (c) carbon saving target in (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17; [203282]

(3) what estimate his Department has made of expenditure under (a) affordable warmth, (b) carbon savings community and (c) carbon saving target in (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16 and (iii) 2016-17. [203284]

Gregory Barker: The Department's latest assessment of the impact of the three energy company obligation (ECO) targets on the number of households supported, energy company spending and number of measures installed is set out in the 5 March ‘The Future of the Energy Company Obligation’:

Assessment of Impacts:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/286926/The_Future_of_the_Energy_ Company_Obligation_Assessment_of_Impacts.pdf

The Department will be publishing a final assessment of the impact of the ECO policy to accompany the forthcoming response to the Government's consultation on the Future of the Energy Company Obligation.

Green Deal Scheme

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 19 June 2014, Official Report, column 1247, on energy efficiency, what the evidential basis is for the statement that Green Deal assessments are stimulating action on energy efficiency. [203338]

Gregory Barker: DECC research has consistently shown that around four fifths of households that had a Green Deal assessment have installed, were in the process or intended to install at least one measure. Research published in March 2014, showed that 22% of households that had an installation after a Green Deal assessment were not thinking about installing that measure before they had an assessment. For those households that installed solid wall insulation, 70% of them were not thinking about installing it before they had a Green Deal assessment.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the number of households that have paid for a Green Deal assessment to date. [203370]

Gregory Barker: Previous DECC research has shown that around one in 10 households that have had a Green Deal assessment paid, at least in part, for it. However the latest DECC research, published in June 2014, showed that 14% of households paid, at least in part, towards an assessment. This research was carried out with households that had an assessment between 1 January and 30 March 2014 and shows that the number of households paying for an assessment increased.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much his Department has spent on free Green Deal assessments for households to date. [203371]

7 July 2014 : Column 68W

Gregory Barker: £100 cashback is available for households that have a Green Deal assessment and install a measure via the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund route, however the scheme only recently launched and it is too early to give a figure on spend. Local authorities offered free Green Deal assessments from Green Deal Pioneer Places Fund and DECC estimates that 9,543 free assessments were funded through it. The Pioneer Places Fund of £10 million was allocated to local authorities and/or consortia of local authorities in England to demonstrate ambitious approaches to kick starting local Green Deal activity in both the domestic and non-domestic sectors. As well as funding Green Deal assessments, activities that were supported by DECC funding included: piloting local marketing approaches, including a street by street approach to roll out, establishing a network of local Green Deal show homes, area wide events to publicise the Green Deal, working with local partners such as the local NHS to drive demand for the Green Deal and working with community and other civil society groups to deliver demand for the Green Deal.

Housing: Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate his Department has made of the average annual saving to a household's energy bill from a (a) condensing gas boiler, (b) cavity wall insulation, (c) loft insulation, (d) solid wall insulation and (e) other forms of insulation. [203363]

Gregory Barker: The saving on energy bills from installing heating and insulation measures will depend on several factors including the particular measure, energy prices and household characteristics that affect their energy consumption.

DECC has estimated that households can save from around £25 to £270 or more per installation per year from installing the main insulation measures. This is based on estimated energy savings from an illustrative three bedroom semi-detached house. Further information on illustrative bill savings for different measures can be found in table 49 of the 2012 Final Green Deal and ECO IA:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/42984/5533-final-stage-impact-assessment-for-the-green-deal-a.pdf

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what consumer research his Department has commissioned on (a) the Green Deal and (b) the Energy Company Obligation since 2013. [203372]

Gregory Barker: As part of our evaluation of Green Deal and ECO we have commissioned a range of consumer research, covering research into the customer journey including people’s views, attitudes and experiences of the Green Deal and ECO journeys, the experience of arranging assessments, actions and intentions after receipt of a Green Deal Advice Report and general public awareness of Green Deal. DECC has published the various outputs of this research on its website and will continue to do so in line with the Government Social Research publication guidance.

7 July 2014 : Column 69W

Nuclear Power: China

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will publish all documentation relating to the nuclear power investment signed with the Prime Minister of China covering Chinese state companies on 17 June 2014; and if he will publish all subsequent documentation. [202370]

Michael Fallon: On 17 June 2014, the UK and China signed the Joint Statement on Civil Nuclear Energy Co-operation. DECC was also a co-signatory to the Memorandum of Understanding on Enhancing Co-operation in the Field of Civil Nuclear Industry Fuel Cycle Supply Chain. Both documents are online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/multimillion-boost-to-uk-economy-as-china-and-uk-government-sign-civil-nuclear-agreement-and-sign-agreement-to-deepen-cooperation-on-climate-change

Renewable Energy: Heating

Graham Stringer: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to the answer of 3 February 2014, Official Report, columns 133-34W, on renewable energy: heating, when he expects to publish the data on the effect on electricity bills in households using heat pumps. [203441]

Gregory Barker: In January this year, we published a preliminary report on the Renewable Heat Premium Payment (RHPP) heat pump metering programme. This is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/276612/Preliminary_Report_on_the_ RHPP_metering_programme_2014-01-31.pdf

This report presents data from more than 400 heat pumps installed in domestic properties on a trial basis.

Wind Power

Sammy Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much has been paid in constraint payments to wind reproducers in each of the last three years. [202973]

Michael Fallon: Constraint payments relating to England, Scotland and Wales are made by National Grid through competitive market arrangements in order to help ensure the secure operation of the electricity system. National Grid has advised that details of most individual constraint payments to wind farms are published at:

www.elexon.co.uk

and

www.bmreports.com

and aggregated data on payments to wind farms is published in its “Monthly Balancing Services Summary”, which is available at:

www2.nationalgrid.com/UK/Industry-information/Electricity-transmission-operational-data/Report-explorer/Services-Reports/

Energy policy in Northern Ireland is devolved to the Northern Ireland Executive. The Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment Northern Ireland has advised that constraint payments are a commercial matter between the Single Electricity Market Operator (SEMO) and the generator.

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Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture: Subsidies

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) if he will estimate the effect on farmers in England of capping direct payments to farmers and initiating a 15% reduction on payments over £150,000 and a complete cap at payments of £300,000; [203135]

(2) what alternative proposals on the capping of payments to farmers in England were considered beyond the five per cent reduction for basic payments above £150,000. [203134]

George Eustice: We put forward proposals for reductions of direct payments to farmers as part of our wider consultation on CAP reform in October 2013. The consultation included estimates for the amounts which would be transferred annually to Rural Development programmes arising from reductions of 5% and 100% (i.e. capping), further analysis was included in the evidence paper published alongside the consultation. These can both be found at:

https://consult.defra.gov.uk/agricultural-policy/cap-consultation

We announced in December that reductions would be applied at 5% on amounts in excess of €150,000; however, we no longer take the view, contained in our response to the consultation, that we have no power to make further or alternative reductions at a higher threshold such as €300,000.

Animal Welfare: Circuses

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many times each circus licensed under the Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012 was inspected in (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; and how many animals of each species each circus is currently licensed to hold. [203233]

George Eustice: The Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012 came into force in January 2013. Only two circuses have been licensed under the Regulations: Circus Mondao and Jolly’s Circus. During 2013 there were three inspections by a DEFRA appointed inspector of Circus Mondao and four inspections by a DEFRA appointed inspector of Jolly’s Circus. So far during 2014 there has been one such inspection of Circus Mondao and two such inspections of Jolly’s Circus. Further such inspections are planned during 2014. Currently, Circus Mondao is licensed to use: two camels, two reindeer and a zebra. Jolly’s Circus is licensed to use: an ankoli, a camel, a fox, two lions, a racoon, four reindeer, three snakes, three tigers and two zebra.

Environment Protection: Seas and Oceans

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he plans to take to implement the recommendations in the Global Ocean Commission's report, From Decline to Recovery: A Rescue Package for the Global Ocean. [203414]

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George Eustice: The UK Government is already playing a key role in tackling a number of issues raised in this report. For example, we are already pressing for an agreement under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea on the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction, in ensuring implementation of UN Resolution 61/105 on sustainable fisheries, and in promoting action to combat illegal fishing. We are also working with partner countries in OSPAR on a range of environmental measures in the north-east Atlantic including a regional action plan to address marine litter.

Flood Control: Lancashire

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to Lancaster city council's Local Plan for Lancaster District 2011-2031: Strategic Options for Land Allocations, what assessment his Department has made of the drainage and flood prevention measures that would be required in respect of the 5,000 new homes in the rural area of the Lune Valley that would be required under Option 5 of that plan. [203505]

Dan Rogerson: We have not made any specific assessment as the drafting of a Local Plan is a matter for the local council.

Planning guidance is clear that infrastructure requirements must be considered by councils when making plans.

Food Supply Networks Review

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his Department's response is to the recommendations of the Elliott Review into the Integrity and Assurance of Food Supply Networks. [203701]

George Eustice: We are considering Professor Elliott's interim report recommendations. We will respond to his final report, which is due to be published shortly.

Food: Fraud

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many officials in his Department are currently working on food authenticity. [202971]

George Eustice: Currently, 13 DEFRA officials work wholly or partly on aspects of food authenticity. This includes work on food composition and standards, food labelling and related science, including development of methodologies for detecting food authenticity. DEFRA works closely with the Food Standards Agency which has responsibility for surveillance and enforcement policy.

Gamekeepers

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) how many people have become gamekeepers in each of the last three years; and what the age group and gender is of all registered gamekeepers; [203213]

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(2) what steps his Department is taking to encourage more people to become gamekeepers. [203212]

George Eustice: DEFRA does not hold information on employment figures for gamekeepers. There is no requirement for gamekeepers or employers of gamekeepers to report this information to DEFRA.

It is for landowners and gamekeeping organisations to encourage more people to become gamekeepers. However, DEFRA invests in a range of rural skills and jobs through initiatives under the Rural Development Programme for England.

Pay

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs which organisations collect subscriptions through the employers' payroll service in his Department and its agencies. [203104]

Dan Rogerson: This response covers Core DEFRA, Animal Health Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA), the Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA), the Rural Payments Agency (RPA) and the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD).

DEFRA and its agencies allow the following organisations to collect subscriptions through its payroll services:

AXA Sun Life (FERA only)

Benenden Healthcare Society

Birmingham Hosp Saturday Fund (AHVLA and RPA only)

Charitable Giving

Charity for Civil Servants

Civil Service Benevolent Fund

Civil Service Club

Civil Service Pension Scheme (inc stakeholder)

Civil Service Retirement Fellowship

Civil Service Sports Council

Commercial Union Life Assurance

Customs and Excise Sports Club (core DEFRA only)

Customs Fund Insurance (core DEFRA only)

Cyclescheme (FERA only)

DEFRA Lottery

Department of Environment Recreational Association (core DEFRA only)

Dimensions Fitness

Fideliti

First Division Association

Forester Health Plan Scheme

General, Municipal and Boilermakers (AHVLA only)

Give As You Earn (RPA and CEFAS only)

Halfords

HAS Crown Plan and Individual (RPA only)

Hospital Savings Association

Land Registry Sports and Social (VMD only)

Leeds Hospital Fund (AHVLA only)

Medicash Health Scheme (CEFAS and RPA only)

Minerva Sports and Social (VMD only)

Prospect

Public and Commercial Services Union

Simply Health (core DEFRA and FERA only)

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Sodexo (FERA only)

Sovereign Health Care (core DEFRA and FERA only)

SSA Lottery (CEFAS only)

Sun Life Assurance Company

Welsh Hospitals (AHVLA only)

Welsh Office Sports and Social Association (core DEFRA only)

Policy

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what explicit monetary value his Department assigns to the value of preventing a fatality calculation during the process of policy appraisal and evaluation. [203068]

Dan Rogerson: The Department uses the methodology most appropriate to the policy question-for example, whether the policy reduces the risk of a sudden loss of life or whether the policy increases life expectancy.

Air quality affects people’s health and their life expectancy, this is reflected in policy appraisal with a ‘lost life years’ methodology employing a value of £29,000 per year of lost life (in 2004 prices). This figure was informed by a 2004 DEFRA report entitled Valuation of Health Benefits Associated with Reduction in Air Pollution available here

http://archive.defra.gov.uk/environment/quality/air/airquality/publications/healthbenefits/airpollution_reduction.pdf

The 2004 study did not directly give the £29,000 figure but was instrumental in its adoption.

Alternatively, appraisal of policy that prevents sudden loss of life, such as those relating to flood risk, is supported by published DEFRA guidance on risk to life of flooding which we provide a copy of. This guidance refers to the Green Book which includes a value of preventing fatality of about £1.145million (in 2000 prices). This estimate is not appropriate in all situations but represents a readily available value of changes in risks of fatalities.

The methodology used by the Department is likely to evolve over time as new evidence is developed.

Documents provided:

Defra, May 2008. Supplementary Note to Operating Authorities, Assessing and Valuing the Risk to Life from Flooding for use in Appraisal of Risk Management Measures.

Valuation of Life and Health Inter-departmental Group

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what monetary thresholds were applied to the cost-per-quality adjusted life year quoted in the evidence submitted as part of the Department's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review in 2008; [203066]

(2) what monetary thresholds were applied to the cost-per-quality adjusted life year quoted in the evidence submitted as part of the Environment Agency's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review in 2008. [203067]

Dan Rogerson: I refer the right hon. Member to the reply given on 1 July 2014, Official Report, columns 533-34W.

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The focus of the work of the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health has been methodological rather than upon specific measures of value. It has focused upon the appropriate units for the measurement of impacts on life and health risks in different circumstances, and the methodology to be applied to valuation of those units in different contexts. Nevertheless, as a spur to the methodological investigation, an initial survey of monetary valuations of various units of impact by different Departments and agencies including case studies was undertaken. This was conducted by the Institute of Transport Studies at the University of Leeds and compiled into a "Survey of the Value of Life/ Health used in Government Departments", which has been placed in the Library. In addition, HSE and DFT have already placed in the Library their members' responses to the ITS survey.

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what measures of the value of life and health were included in the evidence submitted as part of the Environment Agency's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review in 2008; [203078]

(2) what measures of the value of life and health were included in the evidence submitted as part of his Department's work with the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review. [203076]

Dan Rogerson: The focus of the work of the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health has been methodological rather than upon specific measures of value.

The value of life and health measures submitted by the Department through discussions at the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review referred to DEFRA's guidance on valuing risk to life from Flooding and the “lost life years” estimate associated with reductions in air pollution.

A copy of the published DEFRA guidance has been placed in the House Library.

The Environment Agency evidence to the Inter-departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health review was submitted in March 2008. It did not include any measures of the value of life and health. It did refer to DEFRA guidance on valuing risk to life, which was under preparation at the time of the review and published in May 2008.

A copy of the Environment Agency submission to the Review has been placed in the House Library.

Documents provided:

Environment Agency, March 2008, response to the Inter-Departmental Group for the Valuation of Life and Health Survey.

Defra, May 2008. Supplementary Note to Operating Authorities, Assessing and Valuing the Risk to Life from Flooding for use in Appraisal of Risk Management Measures.

Water Charges

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what guidance he has produced on how his Department, OFWAT and water companies should monitor and assess affordability for consumers when carrying out their functions; [203320]

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(2) if he will publish all work undertaken by his Department to (a) define what is affordable for consumers to pay to the water industry and (b) assess whether charges made by the water industry to consumers are affordable; [203253]

(3) what work his Department has done to assess the long-term effect of investment and pricing decisions made by (a) his Department, (b) OFWAT and (c) water companies on affordability for consumers; and if he will publish all such work. [203319]

Dan Rogerson: As the independent economic regulator for the water sector, it is OFWAT’s duty to review water prices every five years. This includes assessing the investment and pricing proposals included in water company business plans before setting limits on what companies can charge their customers. Most company business plans are proposing flat or declining customer bills from 2015.

OFWAT has a rolling programme of activity to keep under review issues relating to affordability and it publishes analysis in this area. OFWAT is guided in its work by DEFRA’s Strategic Policy Statement, published in May 2013, which sets out the policy framework within which the water regulator must operate and it identifies tackling affordability pressures as a key priority. OFWAT is required to monitor the action taken by water companies to help customers who struggle to afford their bills and report on this to the Secretary of State annually.

The Government has published guidance to water companies on the introduction of social tariffs, to assist them in providing support to customers at risk of affordability problems. The Government encourages water companies to introduce social tariffs to help vulnerable customers, taking account of local circumstances, needs and views.

DEFRA is currently working with OFWAT and the Environment Agency to assess the long-term affordability of water bills. This work will incorporate the outcomes of OFWAT’s current review of water prices, which concludes in December 2014, and will report in 2015.

Wildlife: Imports

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what guidance his Department gives UK nationals on purchasing or acquiring (a) abalone, (b) coral, (c) conch, (d) shark fin, (e) sea turtle meat or shells, (f) bushmeat, (g) ivory and (h) rhino horn when overseas. [203473]

George Eustice: The trade in endangered animal and plant species, and their import and export, is controlled by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of wild fauna and flora (CITES).

Guidance on the provisions of CITES are published on GOV.UK at:

www.gov.uk/cites-controls-import-and-export-of-protected-species

Wind Power: Birds

Mr Chope: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the Government's policy is on protecting migratory birds from the effects of offshore wind turbines; and if he will make a statement. [203543]

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George Eustice: The EU Wild Birds Directive provides a strong framework for the protection of birds in Europe. This includes migratory species, both on land and at sea.

The developers of major infrastructure projects such as offshore wind farms are required to assess their impacts on the environment, including birdlife, and mitigate or compensate for impacts that cannot be avoided. The results of these assessments are considered by the relevant decision makers in determining applications for development consent for such projects in accordance with their legal obligations.

Justice

Community Rehabilitation Companies

Jenny Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when community rehabilitation companies are planned to begin providing post-release supervision to offenders serving sentences of under 12 months in prison. [203845]

Jeremy Wright: We are opening up delivery of probation services to a diverse range of new organisations in order to tackle repeat reoffending which blights our communities. As part of our reforms, we will extend post-release supervision to offenders released from custodial sentences of less than 12 months. We plan to commence the relevant provisions of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014 at the point when ownership of the new Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) transfers to successful bidders. We will do this in line with the Government's commitment to roll out these important reforms by 2015.

Courts: Children

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the NSPCC's Order in Court Campaign seeking changes to the way the criminal justice system treats children. [203700]

Damian Green: This question was previously raised under reference number 202662 for answer on Wednesday 2 July 2014. A response has therefore been provided under Hansard reference 670W.

Driving: Licensing

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what guidance he gives to the courts on the disqualification of drivers who have accumulated over 12 points on their driving licence. [203203]

Jeremy Wright: The vast majority of drivers who get 12 or more penalty points are fined and disqualified from driving. Under Section 35 of the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988, disqualification for a minimum of six months must be ordered if an offender incurs 12 penalty points or more within a three-year period, unless the court finds that the period of the totting up disqualification should be reduced or avoided for exceptional hardship or other mitigating circumstances.The minimum

7 July 2014 : Column 77W

period may be automatically increased if the offender has been disqualified within the preceding three years.

The Secretary of State for Justice does not issue guidance to courts on the exercise of this discretion. The Sentencing Council, which operates independently of Government, issues guidelines to the courts on sentencing; their “Magistrates Courts Sentencing Guidelines” deal with totting up disqualification. These Guidelines state that:

“The period of a totting up disqualification can be reduced or avoided for exceptional hardship or other mitigating circumstances. No account is to be taken of hardship that is not exceptional hardship or circumstances alleged to make the offence not serious. Any circumstances taken in account in the preceding three years to reduce or avoid a totting disqualification must be disregarded.”

It is made clear in the Guidelines that magistrates should consult their legal advisor for further guidance on exceptional hardship applications.

The Government is committed to ensuring that penalties reflect the seriousness and culpability of offending behaviour and wants to ensure that we are doing everything we can to keep our roads safe. This is why we have brought forward Government amendments in the Courts and Criminal Justice Bill specifically to deal with disqualified drivers who cause death or serious injury: to increase the maximum penalty for disqualified drivers who cause death, from two to 10 years’ imprisonment; and introducing a new offence of causing serious injury by driving while disqualified, with a maximum penalty of four years imprisonment.

We have also announced our intention to launch a full review of driving offences and penalties, to ensure people who endanger lives and public safety are properly punished.