18 Jun 2014 : Column WA53

Written Answers

Wednesday 18 June 2014

Abortion

Question

Asked by Lord Patten

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the evidence cited in the article “An Increase in the Sex Ratio of Births to India-born Mothers in England and Wales: Evidence for Sex-Selective Abortion” by Sylvie Dubuc and David Coleman published in Population and Development Review, vol 33, No. 2 (June 2007), pp383–400. [HL67]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe) (Con): This article is a useful addition to the evidence base around sex selective abortions.

On 23 May 2014 the Department published updated analysis of birth ratios for England and Wales 2008-2012. The analyses by country of birth and ethnicity did not offer evidence of sex selection taking place within England and Wales. A copy of the report has been placed in the Library. It is also available at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/analysis-of-male-to-female-birth-ratios-in-the-uk-2008-to-2012.

The Department will repeat this analysis on an annual basis following publication of birth data and remain vigilant and receptive to reports of such practice.

Agriculture: Subsidies

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Newby on 6 May (WA 314), what is their estimate of the average additional weekly cost of food to United Kingdom families arising from membership of the Common Agricultural Policy.[HL161]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord De Mauley): As stated in the previous response to WA 314, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) calculates the annual monetary value of gross transfers from EU consumers arising from policies underpinning the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).

The OECD estimates that EU consumers faced higher food prices equivalent to approximately €16 billion in 2012. This equates to 4% of consumption expenditure on agricultural commodities (at farm gate prices), and compares to an average 71% in the late 1980s.

Agricultural commodity prices are a key factor in determining food retail prices but other factors are also important, such as energy prices and exchange

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA54

rates. Therefore the impact of CAP on consumers’ weekly cost of food will be less than the 4% figure reported above.

There is no agreed OECD methodology to disaggregate estimates to individual EU member states, so these figures are not available at the UK level.

Armed Conflict: Sexual Offences

Question

Asked by Baroness Kinnock of Holyhead

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much has been budgeted for covering the cost of the June 2014 Summit which will meet to deliberate on sexual violence in conflict by (1) the Department for International Development, (2) the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, (3) the Ministry of Defence, and (4) the Home Office.[HL56]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi) (Con): In accordance with our usual practice we will publish the final cost once it has been calculated post-Summit. Other departments are not covering the cost of the summit.

Atos Healthcare

Question

Asked by Lord Morrow

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have made any assessment of the compliance of Atos Healthcare with the Human Rights Act 1998, particularly section 6, and the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, particularly Article 3; if so, what is that assessment; and whether all staff of that organisation are fully briefed and supplied with copies of the Act and Convention.[HL159]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud) (Con): The Department for Work and Pensions does not routinely assess Atos Healthcare’s compliance with the Human Rights Act 1998 or the European Convention for Human Rights under its contracts with the Department. However, our contracts with Atos and all of our suppliers include obligations to comply with all legal requirements.

Bahrain

Question

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have held with the government of Bahrain concerning the number of children who have been arrested there since 2011.[HL278]

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The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi) (Con): Our Embassy in Manama has raised the rates of imprisonment of young people with the Ministry of the Interior and senior members of the Government of Bahrain on several occasions. This included supporting the decision by the Ombudsman’s Office of the Ministry of the Interior to investigate fully concerns about the imprisonment of children set out by human rights non-governmental organisations last year.

Bovine Tuberculosis

Question

Asked by Lord Morrow

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they plan to follow the Northern Ireland initiative of “test and vaccinate or remove” in relation to badgers carrying bovine tuberculosis as opposed to any replication of the cull.[HL160]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Lord De Mauley) (Con): The Northern Ireland Executive has begun a five-year ‘test and vaccinate or remove’ tuberculosis research project on badgers in a 100km2 area of County Down. We currently have no plans to adopt this approach in England although we will of course be interested in the outcome of the research in Northern Ireland.

Burma

Question

Asked by Baroness Nye

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the total amount of international aid to Burma and what percentage is provided by them.[HL150]

Baroness Northover (LD): DFID publishes aid statistics each year on the gov.uk website as ‘Statistics on International Development’ (SID). The most recent set of data for which we can compare UK Official Development Assistance (ODA) with the total of bilateral ODA provided by OECD Development Assistance Committee countries to Burma is from 2010, when the overall total was £161 million. The UK provided around 18% of this total.

Charities

Question

Asked by Lord Donoughue

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Statement by Lord Wallace of Saltaire on 18 March (WS 50–52), how many trustees have been removed by the Charity Commission since 2007; how many trustees have been suspended by the Commission since 2007; and what discussions they have had with the Commission about its using its powers to investigate a breach of charitable law.[HL35]

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Lord Wallace of Saltaire (LD): The number of trustees of charities suspended or removed by the Charity Commission in each year since 2007 can be seen in the table below:

Number of trustees suspendedNumber of trustees removed

2013/14

4

0

2012/13

0

0

2011/12

1

0

2010/11

1

0

2009/10

1

0

2008/09

1

1

2007/08

7

6

A number of meetings have been held with the Charity Commission to discuss its use of regulatory powers. The draft Protection of Charities Bill, announced as part of the Queen’s Speech, would strengthen the powers of the Charity Commission to tackle abuse in charities.

Children: Poverty

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they are taking to reduce the number of children living in poverty.[HL158]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud) (Con): This Government remains committed to ending child poverty by 2020. Our approach, based on our published Evidence Review, is to tackle the root causes of child poverty, both now and in the future, by focusing on worklessness, low pay and raising educational attainment. This approach and the actions we propose to take are set out in full in our draft Child Poverty Strategy 2014-17. We will shortly publish the final version of the Strategy.

Crime

Question

Asked by Lord Hughes of Woodside

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Taylor of Holbeach on 11 June (WA 387), whether they will publish in the Official Report the increase or decrease in crime statistics since 2010 for each of the Police Authorities in England and Wales, including London, and for each area covered by Police and Crime Commissioners. [HL296]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire (LD): The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter from Caron Walker, Director, National Accounts & Economic Statistics for Office for National Statistics, dated June 2014

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As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Taylor of Holbeach on 11 June (WA 387), whether they will publish in the Official Report the increase or decrease in crime statistics since 2010 for each of the Police Authorities in England and Wales, including London, and for each area covered by Police and Crime Commissioners [HL296].

From November 2012, Police and Crime Commissioners were elected by the public to be responsible for overseeing police forces with the exception of London. In Greater London there are two police forces. The City of London is policed by the City of London Police and the City of London Corporation is the police authority. The Metropolitan Police District is policed by the Metropolitan Police Service and the Mayor of London is the police authority through the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA58

The latest published police recorded crime data relate to the year ending December 2013. These figures on total recorded crime—excluding fraud—have been provided in the table below for year ending December 2010 to year ending December 2013.

During this period there has been a phased transition of responsibility for the recording of fraud from individual forces to Action Fraud, the national reporting centre for such offences. To provide comparable data on recorded crime across the time period requested, fraud offences have been excluded.

In accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007, statistics based on police recorded crime data were assessed by the UK Statistics Authority against the Code of Practice for Official Statistics in January 2014 and found not to meet the required standard for designation as National Statistics.

The next set of police recorded crime data—relating to the year ending March 2014—is due to be published by the ONS in July 2014.

Police recorded crime by police force area, English regions and Wales, year ending December 2010 to year ending December 2013 1,2
England and Wales
Total recorded crime - excluding fraud
Police Force AreaYear ending Dec 2010Year ending Dec 2011Year ending Dec 2012Year ending Dec 2013Volume change year ending Dec 10 to year ending Dec 13% change year ending Dec 10 to year ending Dec 13

Cleveland

42,945

44,137

39,681

39,177

-3,768

-9

Durham

36,072

35,664

31,152

31,676

-4,396

-12

Northumbria

81,801

76,526

67,425

70,200

-11,601

-14

North East

160,818

156,327

138,258

141,053

-19,765

-12

Cheshire

63,894

60,258

57,013

55,155

-8,739

-14

Cumbria

26,524

26,216

23,392

24,007

-2,517

-9

Greater Manchester

224,470

211,126

185,644

179,658

-44,812

-20

Lancashire

102,292

97,920

94,152

94,115

-8,177

-8

Merseyside

99,633

97,318

90,270

92,271

-7,362

-7

North West

516,813

492,838

450,471

445,206

-71,607

-14

Humberside

74,219

74,282

63,231

64,236

-9,983

-13

North Yorkshire

40,625

39,345

35,241

34,472

-6,153

-15

South Yorkshire

102,998

101,232

94,306

91,266

-11,732

-11

West Yorkshire

186,722

185,301

166,723

160,445

-26,277

-14

Yorkshire and the Humber

404,564

400,160

359,501

350,419

-54,145

-13

Derbyshire

64,844

62,084

52,360

52,290

-12,554

-19

Leicestershire

71,818

67,438

60,597

59,993

-11,825

-16

Lincolnshire

43,426

44,740

38,585

36,105

-7,321

-17

Northamptonshire

49,083

47,996

47,481

41,440

-7,643

-16

Nottinghamshire

84,999

79,328

68,760

68,380

-16,619

-20

East Midlands

314,170

301,586

267,783

258,208

-55,962

-18

Staffordshire

69,864

65,126

60,548

58,896

-10,968

-16

Warwickshire

31,731

33,246

30,274

28,746

-2,985

-9

West Mercia

69,957

69,467

62,005

57,004

-12,953

-19

West Midlands

212,020

198,235

171,788

173,220

-38,800

-18

West Midlands

383,572

366,074

324,615

317,866

-65,706

-17

Bedfordshire

42,244

41,709

35,305

35,583

-6,661

-16

Cambridgeshire

56,068

51,284

47,098

43,209

-12,859

-23

Essex

101,069

103,890

99,164

99,275

-1,794

-2

Hertfordshire

65,174

62,367

53,579

50,358

-14,816

-23

Norfolk

42,479

42,478

37,887

37,468

-5,011

-12

Suffolk

45,448

45,075

40,294

37,341

-8,107

-18

East

352,482

346,803

313,327

303,234

-49,248

-14

London, City of

5,850

6,023

5,642

5,418

-432

-7

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18 Jun 2014 : Column WA60

Metropolitan Police

802,426

794,378

759,761

704,640

-97,786

-12

London

808,276

800,401

765,403

710,058

-98,218

-12

Hampshire

131,488

130,458

109,478

104,284

-27,204

-21

Kent 3

105,023

100,451

97,547

105,950

927

1

Surrey

62,939

62,275

52,892

49,673

-13,266

-21

Sussex

93,999

94,687

91,307

84,658

-9,341

-10

Thames Valley

171,618

152,138

134,674

129,202

-42,416

-25

South East

565,067

540,009

485,898

473,767

-91,300

-16

Avon and Somerset

117,492

115,489

100,909

95,833

-21,659

-18

Devon and Cornwall

85,722

87,862

86,136

85,210

-512

-1

Dorset

45,032

45,758

39,971

38,177

-6,855

-15

Gloucestershire

34,722

35,623

30,201

29,457

-5,265

-15

Wiltshire

37,162

35,314

34,415

32,798

-4,364

-12

South West

320,130

320,046

291,632

281,475

-38,655

-12

ENGLAND

3,825,892

3,724,244

3,396,888

3,281,286

-544,606

-14

Dyfed-Powys

21,433

20,799

19,381

18,566

-2,867

-13

Gwent

46,137

41,044

34,135

34,985

-11,152

-24

North Wales

41,555

42,287

38,956

36,652

-4,903

-12

South Wales

94,718

88,348

83,535

83,089

-11,629

-12

WALES

203,843

192,478

176,007

173,292

-30,551

-15

British Transport Police

57,512

54,378

51,297

49,681

-7,831

-14

ENGLAND AND WALES

4,087,247

3,971,100

3,624,192

3,504,259

-582,988

-14

1. Source: Police recorded crime, Home Office

2. Police recorded crime data are not designated as National Statistics.

3. When interpreting data for Kent, users should be aware of recent changes to recording practices in that force.

Disabled Students’ Allowances

Questions

Asked by Lord Addington

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what progress has been made on defining complex needs for the Disabled Students’ Allowance.[HL42]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what definition of severity for those with dyslexia or specific learning difficulties will be used to justify continued support under the Disabled Students’ Allowance.[HL43]

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Con): Extensive discussions are underway with a wide range of stakeholders to help inform the Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSA) Guidance for 2015/16, due this autumn. The guidance will set out the conditions under which DSA will apply. Students will continue to undergo individual study needs assessments, but their needs will be met by DSA and Higher Education Institutions through their duties under the Equality Act.

Asked by Lord Addington

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how personal histories of recognised special educational needs will be taken into account when making assessments of eligibility for the Disabled Students’ Allowance. [HL44]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what process they will put in place in order to gather information regarding the assessment of eligibility for the Disabled Students’ Allowance.[HL45]

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon: There are no proposed changes to the current process of assessment. All applicants for the Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) will undertake a study needs assessment and independent study needs assessors will provide recommendations, giving due regard to personal histories of recognised special educational needs, where these have been provided. The support and strategies recommended by assessment centres will be provided by a combination of reasonable adjustments by Higher Education Institutions and DSAs.

Asked by Lord Addington

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what percentage of cost is normally allowed for computers and software in one individual allocation of the Disabled Students’ Allowance.[HL46]

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon: Computers and software are drawn from the Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) specialist equipment allowance where a student has been assessed to receive these items. Other items that can be drawn from this allowance include certain items of specialist ergonomic equipment. For the 2013/14

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA61

academic year, the maximum amount available to a student from this allowance for the whole course is £5,212 for full time and part time students. There is one single DSA allowance of £10,362 for postgraduate students, from which computers and software can be drawn.

Employment Tribunals Service

Question

Asked by Baroness Thornton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what monitoring they are conducting on the effect of the increase in tribunal costs on cases being brought concerning harassment in the workplace.[HL147]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Faulks) (Con): The Justice Secretary is committed to reviewing the impact of the introduction of fees in the employment tribunals system. The Ministry of Justice is currently finalising arrangements for the timing and scope of this review, to enable the impacts to be properly assessed, and we will be making an announcement in due course.

Energy: Prices

Question

Asked by Lord Berkeley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the proposal to introduce contracts for difference auctioning has been reassessed following the European Commission's adoption of the final state aid guidelines for environmental protection and energy for 2014–2020; if so whether they specifically considered (1) the risk of the proposal failing to conform with the Commission’s guidance that competitive bidding should be non-discriminatory due to the distinction the proposal makes between “established” and “less established” technologies, (2) the risk of the proposal failing to conform to the guidelines on the grounds of providing “asymmetric information” to the United Kingdom energy market, and (3) the risk of the proposal failing to conform with the Commission’s guidance within General Conditions which stipulates that “the selection process should lead to the selection of beneficiaries that can address the environmental or energy objectives using the least amount of aid or in the most cost-effective way”; in each case, what conclusion they reached; and, in each case, what was the rationale for the conclusion.[HL198]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change (Baroness Verma) (Con): The move to competitive allocation of CfDs has been a long-standing feature of Electricity Market Reform. In early 2014, the Government consulted on proposals to move straight to competitive allocation for some technologies. EU ‘Guidelines on State aid for environmental protection and energy 2014-2020’ were adopted in principle on 9 April 2014. Prior to that adoption, the European Commission worked with member states on the development of the guidelines, including through draft versions and receiving comments.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA62

Implementation of key EMR policies is subject to State Aid approval, and the Government has been in discussion with the European Commission for some time to ensure our policies comply. These conversations remain constructive and we are making the strongest possible case for our policies which we believe are consistent with the new guidelines. To maintain effective working relationships with the Commission, we do not comment publicly on the specifics of cases.

EU Institutions

Questions

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the total annual cost to the European Union institutions of (1) translating documents, speeches and other texts, and (2) simultaneous interpretation in all member languages; and what is their estimate of the saving if that service were limited to the six most used languages.[HL4]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi): Each European Union Institution is responsible for its own translation and interpretation systems and costs. The Annual Budget 2014 has €388 million payments allocated to “language services” for the European Commission.

Asked by Lord Lester of Herne Hill

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will make representations to the European Commission regarding the interpretation of European Regulation 1049/2001 of 30 May 2001 so as to promote effective access to information without excessive restrictions. [HL82]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Faulks) (Con): The Government recognises the importance of transparency by European Union institutions, with appropriate safeguards for genuinely sensitive information, and the key role the Regulation plays in promoting openness and accountability. However, the Government has no plans to make representations to the European Commission regarding the interpretation of Regulation 1049/2001 on public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission documents.

Euthanasia

Question

Asked by Baroness Meacher

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the level of support for a change in the law on assisted dying for people with a terminal illness.[HL39]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Faulks) (Con): The Government has not itself made any assessment of the level of support for a change in the law on assisted dying.

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Former Prime Ministers: Allowances

Question

Asked by Lord Storey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Wallace of Saltaire on 14 May (WA 512), where all past public duty cost allowance audit reports compiled by the National Audit Office, including all (1) submitted receipts, and (2) supporting documentation provided in support of former Prime Ministers’ claims, may be accessed; and whether they will place copies of all such audit reports, regarding each former Prime Minister’s spending in the last 20 years, in the Library of the House.[HL81]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire (LD): The Public Duty Cost Allowance (PDCA) is subject to audit, both by Internal Audit and the National Audit Office. Relevant supporting documentation is provided in support of claims. The Certificate and Report of the Comptroller and Auditor General to the House of Commons is published as part of the Cabinet Office Annual Report. Copies of the Annual Report can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/cabinet-office-annual-reports-and-accounts.

Gibraltar: Spain

Questions

Asked by Lord Hoyle

To ask Her Majesty’s Government why Royal Air Force aircraft flying to Gibraltar cannot fly over Spain; what cost that adds to the flight; and what representations they have made to the government of Spain about the restriction.[HL40]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever): All requests to Spanish authorities by any nation for a military over flight that has Gibraltar as a departure or arrival airfield, is routinely denied by Spanish authorities. We make clear to the Spanish government that this is not the sort of arrangement close allies should have to manage.

The military aircraft that routinely fly to Gibraltar are the Hercules C130 and C17 Globemaster. The difference in cost of a direct flight to Gibraltar from, for example, RAF Brize Norton and a route not overflying Spain is as follows.

C130 - £2,600 each way

C17 - £4,900 each way

It should be noted that Spanish authorities are swift and cooperative in allowing our military aircraft to pass through Spanish airspace to any other destination. The refusal to use their airspace to access Gibraltar is an irritant that we have managed since the 1980s, and is set against an otherwise productive defence relationship between our two countries.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA64

Asked by Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what progress they are making in talks with Spain to prevent excessive delays at its border with Gibraltar.[HL202]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi) (Con): The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right Hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague), suggested ad hoc talks, involving all relevant parties, to address practical issues (including the delays at the border) to the Spanish government in April 2012. We are actively discussing this proposal with the Governments of Gibraltar and Spain and hope it will be possible to hold talks soon.

In the meantime, we are maintaining strong diplomatic pressure on the Spanish government to end disproportionate and unlawful checks at the border. We have also asked the European Commission to continue to monitor the situation and urge Spain to return their checks at the border to proportionate levels.

Great Western Railway Line

Question

Asked by Lord Berkeley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Kramer on 13 May (WA 492), what is their latest estimate of the net present value (NPV) of the contract with Agility Trains West covering the provision of Intercity Express trains for the Great Western; what is the annual charge used to calculate the NPV; and how many diagrammed trains and diagrammed vehicles are to be covered.[HL98]

The Minister of State, Department for Transport (Baroness Kramer) (LD): The net present value of the Great Western fleet is £3.0bn in 2009 prices. This is for a fleet of 322 diagrammed vehicles over 50 diagrammed trains. The total Set Availability Payment for the full Great Western fleet in 1 April 2019 - 31 March 2020 (the first year of full fleet operation) is £333.7m in nominal 2019 prices.

Health Centres: Worcester

Questions

Asked by Lord Hunt of Kings Heath

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they are taking any action to prevent the closure of the Worcester Walk-In Health Centre; and if so, what.[HL134]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the closure of Worcester Walk-In Health Centre on the emergency department at Worcestershire Royal Hospital. [HL135]

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA65

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made as to which alternative facilities will be used by those who currently use Worcester Walk-In Health Centre if it is closed.[HL136]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe) (Con): The reconfiguration of local health services is a matter for the National Health Service. All service changes should be led by clinicians and be in the best interests of patients, not driven from the top down.

We are aware that the local consultation on the Worcestershire Urgent Care Strategy closed on 9 April 2014. The clinical commissioning groups in Worcestershire are now considering the responses. No decisions have yet been made.

Homicide

Question

Asked by Lord Tebbit

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people have been killed in the United Kingdom since 1984 by persons previously convicted of homicide.[HL20]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Faulks): A life sentence is mandatory on conviction for murder and a whole life order starting point applies to a murder by an offender previously convicted of murder. Discretionary life sentences or long determinate sentences are available for other very serious offences. This Government has introduced an automatic life sentence for a second very serious violent or sexual offence.

The Ministry of Justice (MoJ) holds information on those persons convicted of homicide offences having previously been convicted of a homicide offence. However, the MOJ does not hold information centrally on the number of homicide victims associated with these crimes.

The table shows the number of offenders with previous convictions for homicide by offenders convicted of homicide in each year from 2001 to 2013. Homicide includes among others, the offences of murder, manslaughter, infanticide, corporate manslaughter and causing death by dangerous and careless driving. See footnote 3 for all types of homicides.

The MoJ’s extract of the Police National Computer only holds the complete criminal records of offenders who have been sentenced or cautioned since the beginning of 2000, Therefore it is not possible to provide criminal history time series information all the way back to 1984.

The figures given in the table have been drawn from the extract of Police National Computer (PNC) data held by the Ministry of Justice. As with any large scale recording system the PNC is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA66

Table: Number of offenders with previous conviction(s) for homicide2 by people convicted of homicide1 in each year from 2001 to 2013
Number of offenders
YearWith previous conviction(s) for homicideAll1

2001

8

882

2002

4

943

2003

3

861

2004

7

988

2005

8

1,015

2006

10

952

2007

8

947

2008

6

995

2009

3

1,007

2010

9

1,039

2011

14

959

2012

8

939

2013

9

919

Source Police National Computer (PNC)

1. All offender figures are based on counting the number of sentencing occasions for an homicide offence committed by offenders who were prosecuted by police forces in England and Wales including the British Transport Police. Offenders who have been convicted on more than one occasion during the year and across the years will be represented in the table several times.

2. All previous conviction figures are based on counting the number of convictions on which offenders have previously been convicted for a homicide offence recorded on the Police National Computer, including some offences committed outside of England and Wales.

3. Homicide is defined by the following crimes and may include different crimes to other published data:

Common Law Murder of persons aged 1 year or over

Common Law Murder of infants under 1 year of age.

Common Law. & 'Offences against the Person Act 1861' S.5;9;10. Manslaughter

Infanticide Act 1938. Infanticide

Infant Life Preservation Act 1929. Child destruction

Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec.1 ( 1 ). As amended by the Road Traffic Act 1991 S.1 & CJA 1993 S.67 Causing death by dangerous driving.

Homicide Act 1957, Sec.2. Manslaughter, Diminished Responsibility.

Road Traffic Act 1988 Sect3 A. as added by the RTA 1991 S.3 & amended by CJA 1993 S.67. Causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs

Cause/allow death of a child or vulnerable person. Domestic Violence, Crime & Victims Act 2004 S.5

Causing death by careless or inconsiderate driving; Road Traffic Act 1988 S.2B as added by Road Safety Act S.20

Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers; Road Traffic Act 1988 S.3ZB as added by Road Safety Act S.21

Corporate manslaughter / homicide

Theft Act 1968 S.12A as added by the Aggravated Vehicle Taking Act 1992 S.1 - Aggravated taking where owing to the driving of the vehicle an accident occurs causing the death of any person

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA67

House of Lords: Security

Question

Asked by Lord Stoddart of Swindon

To ask the Chairman of Committees whether he will initiate a debate in the House of Lords before any decision is taken to privatise the security arrangements of the House.[HL213]

The Chairman of Committees (Lord Sewel): The following information about decisions on the new security contract arrangements was published in March 2014:

“In March 2015, the current contract with the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to provide armed protection, policing and security officer functions will expire. Over the last year, the Security Arrangements Renewal Programme (SARP) Board has been working to analyse options and make a recommendation on new contract arrangements to be introduced next year. That recommendation was endorsed by the Lords House Committee and the Commons Commission.

The agreed recommendation is that the two Houses should renegotiate with the MPS to continue to provide security officer functions, armed protection and policing, whilst moving the provision of the search and screening function for the three main public entrances (Black Rod’s Garden, Cromwell Green and Portcullis House) to a specialist commercial provider. The Clerk of the House and the Clerk of the Parliaments have now written to the Metropolitan Police Commissioner requesting new arrangements from 2015, and a commercial procurement for search and screening will start soon.

This is a major contract for Parliament, both in terms of its financial value and its central role in ensuring the security of parliamentarians, employees and visitors to the Parliamentary Estate. As well as continuing to benefit from the expertise and experience of the Metropolitan Police officers and staff, new search and screening arrangements at the busiest public entrances will be better able to provide the greater flexibility and scalability needed to meet Parliament’s changing requirements for public access”.

Discussions with the Metropolitan Police Service on future arrangements are continuing. Security matters are not discussed on the floor of the House and the House Committee has agreed to the initial approach taken by the Security Arrangements Renewal Programme Board. That Committee will be further consulted during the process. I have no plans to initiate a debate on the floor of the House.

Housing Benefit

Question

Asked by Baroness King of Bow

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much Discretionary Housing Payment funding made available to local authorities in 2013–14 was unspent and returned to the Department for Work and Pensions at the end of the year.[HL333]

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA68

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions (Lord Freud) (Con): The information requested is due to be published shortly as part of wider analysis on the use of Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP) in 2013/14.

Israel

Questions

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have made to the government of Israel concerning the Palestinian footballers, Adam and Johar Halabiya, who were reportedly arrested without charge at the Jordan and West Bank border, following their hospital treatment for gunshot wounds.[HL71]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi) (Con): Officials from our Embassy in Tel Aviv have spoken to the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) on the issue. The IDF have informed us that Adam and Johar Halabiya were transferred to Jordan for medical treatment and that the IDF approved their continued treatment during detention. Upon their release from the hospital, they were arrested on a terrorism-related charge.

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations they have made to the government of Israel about its holding children detained in the West Bank and East Jerusalem in immediate solitary confinement; whether they have any plans to work within the European Union to end the practice; whether they know when the proposed system of summons will start; and whether they will take steps to ensure access by parents to their children in custody.[HL172]

Baroness Warsi: The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. Friend the Member for Epsom and Ewell (Mr Grayling), raised the treatment of child detainees with the Israeli Supreme Court President during his visit to Israel in May. The system of summons started in February 2014. It has already shown initial success in decreasing the number of children arrested at night. We intend to carry out further analysis on this system over the coming months. As a recent progress report by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) indicates, Israel has taken some positive steps towards addressing the recommendations in UNICEF’s Children in Israeli Military Detention report. These include: the introduction of legal obligations to inform the child’s parents of an arrest and grant them legal status to be represented in court, as well as to notify minors of their legal rights; and standard operating procedures on methods of restraint. The Government will continue to work, both through bilateral engagement and through the EU, to encourage Israel to take further positive steps.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA69

Asked by Baroness Tonge

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office-sponsored report, Children in Military Custody, on Israeli interrogation methods of Palestinian children; and what follow-up to the report they intend to undertake.[HL274]

Baroness Warsi: The Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right Hon. Friend the Member for Faversham and Mid Kent (Mr Robertson), wrote to the Israeli Attorney General on 31 March 2014 to welcome the steps taken to date and to call for further measures, including the mandatory use of audio-visual recording of interrogations, investigation into continued reports of single hand ties being used, and an end to solitary confinement for children. These were key UK recommendations at Israel’s Universal Periodic Review session at the UN Human Rights Council on 29 October 2013.

A progress report published in October 2013 by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) indicates that Israel has taken some positive steps towards addressing the recommendations in the report. These include: the introduction of legal obligations to inform the child’s parents of an arrest and grant them legal status to be represented in court, as well as to notify minors of their legal rights; and standard operating procedures on methods of restraint. The Israeli military are also piloting a new procedure across the West Bank, whereby children are issued a summons to attend a police station in the morning, rather than being arrested at night, in their homes. The UK believes that the report “Children in Military Custody” has helped contribute to these changes in practice.

Lobbying

Question

Asked by Lord Tebbit

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their total expenditure on financial support for organisations which lobby them on government policy.[HL19]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire (LD): The information requested is not held centrally. Government Departments fund and contract with various organisations. It would be a matter for the relevant Department to determine whether any of these organisations lobby the government inappropriately.

Medical Certificates

Question

Asked by Lord Trefgarne

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the average time taken by general practitioners to complete the medical forms required by candidates for the Territorial Army and Army Reserve; and what is the number presently outstanding.[HL15]

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA70

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Ministry of Defence (Lord Astor of Hever) (Con): The average time taken by General Practitioners to complete medical forms for Army Reserve applicants is 29 days. This includes the time taken by the candidate to provide the documents to their General Practitioner as well as the time taken by General Practitioners to process the forms. This has reduced from 37 days which was the average prior to the implementation of the improved medical process for recruits in February 2014.

As at 6 June 2014, 1,315 sets of Army Reserve medical declaration documents were outstanding.

Mental Health Services

Question

Asked by Lord Laming

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure there are sufficient beds in acute mental health services.[HL143]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe) (Con): The Government has made it clear that beds must always be available for those who need them. The 2014-15 Mandate to NHS England states that every community must develop plans to ensure no one in mental health crisis will be turned away. In February 2014 we published the mental health Crisis Care Concordat, which describes the roles and responsibilities for improving outcomes for people experiencing a crisis. This makes it clear that local commissioners should commission a range of mental health services that allows beds to be readily available for people in urgent need. Local areas are expected to commit to and agree to deliver their own ‘Mental Health Crisis Declaration’.

Minimum Wage

Question

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to enforce the National Minimum Wage, and in particular to protect the employees of agencies and those on zero-hours contracts from exploitation.[HL5]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (Viscount Younger of Leckie) (Con): The Government is committed to increasing compliance with minimum wage legislation and effective enforcement of it. Everyone who is entitled to the minimum wage should receive it.

HMRC enforces the National Minimum Wage for all workers. This includes agency workers and those on zero hour contracts. HMRC investigates every complaint made to the Pay and Work Rights helpline. In addition, HMRC conducts risk-based enforcement in sectors or areas where there is a higher risk of workers not getting paid the legal minimum wage.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA71

The Government is taking a tougher approach on employers that break National Minimum Wage law and has already made it simpler to name and shame employers that break NMW law. The Government has also increased the financial penalty percentage that employers pay for breaking minimum wage law.

National Probation Service for England and Wales

Questions

Asked by Lord Beecham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the budgeted annual expenditure of the National Probation Service.[HL117]

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of the National Probation Service budget has been allocated for the management of high-risk cases. [HL118]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Faulks) (Con): The total probation budget for 2014-15 is £804 million. This includes the first two months of the financial year, during which services were provided by the probation trusts. As well as operational delivery, the probation budget includes provision of corporate services to support the new operating model.

The budget figure is based on an initial assessment of operational and business needs and may vary within the financial period. The costs associated with high-risk offenders fall within a number of budget items and do not constitute a separate category.

Older People

Question

Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they are taking to support elderly people who live secluded lives.[HL153]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe) (Con): The Department is raising awareness of the issue and helping local health and wellbeing boards and commissioners to get better at measuring the issue in their local communities. This will help them come up with the right targeted solutions, and drive local improvements that really make a difference.

A measure of social isolation will be published this year as part of the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework to raise visibility and to support local authorities to address the issue of social isolation in their local communities. This measure will be shared with the Public Health Outcomes Framework.

The Department is also working with a number of organisations including the Campaign to End Loneliness and the Royal Voluntary Service to promote ways to tackle loneliness, and the Silverline who provide a helpline offering support to older people.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA72

Patients: Homelessness

Question

Asked by Baroness Armstrong of Hill Top

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the pilot schemes on discharge from hospital of the homeless.[HL32]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe) (Con): We have commissioned Homeless Link to undertake an evaluation of the Homeless Hospital Discharge Fund and expect to receive a full report in September.

Pregnancy: Drugs

Questions

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how the Department of Health plans to cover the cost of the number of children requiring specialised healthcare due to the effects of fetal valproate syndrome. [HL267]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe) (Con): The health and care needs of children with fetal valproate syndrome will be met by a range of services and in the majority of cases the local clinical commissioning group (CCG) will decide on the level of provision of services, taking into account the needs of the population it serves. The CCG’s decisions are underpinned by clinical insight and knowledge of local healthcare needs.

Asked by Baroness Masham of Ilton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what information is currently given to female patients concerning the potential problems of taking valproate in pregnancy; and how that information reflects the guidelines established by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence on those issues.[HL269]

Earl Howe: The Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) that accompanies the medicine is intended to supplement the information provided by the prescriber. The PIL for Epilim (a brand of valproate for the treatment of epilepsy) states that women who are pregnant or of childbearing age should not take valproate unless explicitly advised by their doctor and provides information on birth defects, impaired development and other problems which may occur in babies born to mothers who take valproate during pregnancy. The PILs for other brands of valproate used in the treatment of epilepsy and to control mania in bipolar disorder contain similar warnings. The warnings in the information for healthcare professionals, the Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) and the PIL are currently the subject of a Europe–wide review which was prompted by new data on the risk of developmental disorders in children born to mothers who took valproate during pregnancy.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA73

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guideline on epilepsy made the following recommendation as a key priority for implementation: “Women and girls with epilepsy and their partners, as appropriate, must be given accurate information and counselling about contraception, conception, pregnancy, caring for children, breastfeeding and menopause.” NICE’s clinical guideline on bipolar disorder recommends that valproate should not routinely be prescribed to pregnant women with bipolar disorder.

Prerogative of Mercy

Questions

Asked by Lord Empey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to recover records of royal pardons granted between 1987 and 1997.[HL284]

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Wales Office (Baroness Randerson) (LD): The review of Departmental record keeping ordered by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is ongoing.

Northern Ireland Office officials continue to seek information on use of the Royal Prerogative of Mercy (RPM) for the years 1987 to 1997. This includes contact with other Government Departments where relevant material might be held.

Asked by Lord Empey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they have sought assistance from the Royal Household in recovering records of royal pardons granted between 1987 and 1997.[HL287]

Baroness Randerson: The review of Departmental record keeping ordered by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is ongoing.

Northern Ireland Office officials continue to seek information on use of the Royal Prerogative of Mercy (RPM) for the years 1987 to 1997. This includes contact with the Royal Household to ascertain whether they hold any relevant information.

Probation

Question

Asked by Lord Beecham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, in the event of a rise in the anticipated costs of community rehabilitation companies emerging from the bidding process, the Secretary of State will delay the process; and, if so, what estimated impact on the National Probation Service would trigger such a decision. [HL119]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Faulks) (Con): The Transforming Rehabilitation Programme is opening up the market to a diverse range of new providers, so that we can harness the best that the private and voluntary sectors has to offer to

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA74

reduce reoffending. We are on track to award and mobilise Payment by Results (PbR) contracts for offender rehabilitation services across England and Wales by 2015. Bids to run the Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) have yet to be submitted, but are expected by the end of June 2014. We currently have strong, competitive bidder interest across all Contract Package Areas, and we do not expect rising costs to be an issue.

Qatar

Question

Asked by Lord Jones of Cheltenham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the delay by the British Embassy in Doha in issuing new passports to children born to United Kingdom parents in Qatar; and whether they have held discussions with the local authorities over the law in Qatar under which fines may be imposed on foreign nationals who are not in possession of a passport by the age of two months.[HL255]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi) (Con): The British Embassy in Doha no longer issues passports. We have raised with the Qatari authorities the issue of fines imposed on British nationals without a passport, and are working to find an agreed solution. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is working closely with Her Majesty’s Passport Office to overcome any problems that result from a delay in the issuing of British passports. In line with the recent statement on 12 June by the Secretary of State for the Home Department, my right Hon Friend the Member for Maidenhead, South East (Theresa May), any British nationals facing a problem should consult the Embassy to discuss this—including the alternatives for urgent travel to the UK without a full passport.

Rolling Stock

Question

Asked by Lord Bradshaw

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, as part of the technical upgrades for Class 142 Pacer Trains, any provision is being made to update the passenger experience at the same time.[HL208]

The Minister of State, Department for Transport (Baroness Kramer) (LD): The Government understands from the owner of the Class 142 fleet that a new final drive system is being fitted, which will require less maintenance and overhaul than to continue to maintain the old equipment. The operators of this fleet will see a benefit from fewer reliability issues and fewer out of course oil changes and wheel set changes due to final drive issues. No other work to this fleet is currently planned.

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA75

RSPCA

Question

Asked by Lord Donoughue

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord De Mauley on 11 March (WA 374), what offence would be committed by an RSPCA inspector making entry, or attempting to make entry, to private property of a private home without the permission of the owner.[HL33]

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord Faulks): If the RSPCA are investigating an allegation of animal cruelty and the owners do not co-operate or refuse entry to their property, the RSPCA would normally call upon the assistance of the police. The RSPCA has no special powers for entry or search and seizure—these powers lie with police constables and some local authority officers.

As such they would be subject to the law as any member of the public would be.

Senior Civil Servants

Question

Asked by Lord Patel of Blackburn

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the proportion of ethnic minorities in the senior civil service.[HL26]

Lord Wallace of Saltaire (LD): To win the global race we need the best civil servants regardless of their background so we must recruit, retain and promote on the basis of merit. We want to see more talented people, whatever their background, reach the very top roles.

As at 1 October 2013, the proportion of senior civil servants who declared that they are from an ethnic minority background is 3.8%.

We believe that for too long talent management in the Civil Service has been weak and the Government plans to address this as part of its ongoing programme of Civil Service reform.

St Helena

Question

Asked by Lord Jones of Cheltenham

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what progress has been made in negotiations to provide air services to St Helena once the new airport is completed in February 2016; and what steps they are taking to develop the local tourism industry there, including the provision of suitable tourist accommodation. [HL88]

Baroness Northover (LD): St Helena Government (SHG) issued the Pre-Qualification Questionnaire (PQQ) for the air service procurement in June 2014. The PQQ

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA76

is the first stage of the air service procurement and will allow interested airlines to register their intent to bid for the air service.

Enterprise St Helena (ESH), St Helena’s Economic Development Agency, is leading St Helena’s plans to develop its tourism industry and its accommodation. In parallel, ESH is working with local businesses to ensure that the island’s tourist attractions are developed and accredited to international standards.

Syria

Questions

Asked by Lord Empey

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whom they consider to be the legitimate government of Syria.[HL90]

The Senior Minister of State, Department for Communities and Local Government & Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Warsi) (Con): While we consider the National Coalition the sole legitimate representatives of the Syrian people, it is not at present the government in Syria. The Coalition is working to realise the aspirations of the vast majority of Syrians for a democratic and pluralist future for their country. The Assad regime has lost all legitimacy by responding to the demands of its people for their basic rights and freedoms with escalating, and horrifying, brutality: using chemical weapons, heavy artillery and air power against civilians; unlawfully detaining and torturing its own people, including children; and preventing life-saving humanitarian support from getting to those who need it. The recent Syrian presidential elections were a parody of democracy and served only as a reminder of the continued illegitimacy of the Assad regime.

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will make representations to the government of Turkey to help prevent foreign fighters entering Syria.[HL174]

Baroness Warsi: The UK has regular discussions with international partners focused on tackling the shared threat from foreign fighters travelling to Syria. These include contacts with the Government of Turkey, with which we work to prevent foreign fighters from using Turkey as a transit route for Syria, including by strengthening protective security measures and using passenger information.

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the resignation of Mr Lakhdar Brahimi as United Nations mediator in Syria. [HL245]

Baroness Warsi: Lakhdar Brahimi has played a crucial role as joint UN and Arab League Special Envoy for Syria since June 2012. He showed strong leadership and great patience in getting the parties to the conflict round the same table in Geneva and take

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA77

the first steps towards potentially constructive dialogue. The responsibility for the collapse of negotiations rests wholly with the regime’s refusal to engage in discussion on an agenda for future talks put forward by Mr Brahimi. The appointment and mandate of any future UN Special Envoy is still under consideration by the UN.

Asked by Lord Hylton

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the offer of partial amnesties by President Assad of Syria.[HL246]

Baroness Warsi: The limited amnesties on prisoner release offered by President Assad do not offer a genuine solution to the problems in Syria. While the British Government has been consistent in calling for the release of political prisoners it is as yet unclear who these amnesties will affect and how prisoners’ safety will be assured. The lies and brutality of the Assad regime, as set out in the UN’s Commission on Inquiry reports, mean that this amnesty will not provide reassurance to the Syrian opposition. If the Syrian regime is serious about bringing the conflict to an end, then they should release political prisoners unconditionally and negotiate seriously within the framework set out in the Geneva communiqué.

Thameslink Railway Line

Question

Asked by Lord Berkeley

To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Kramer on 13 May (WA 493), what is the amount of the annual charge used to calculate the net present value of the Thameslink rolling stock project and the number of diagrammed multiple units and diagrammed vehicles to be provided.[HL129]

The Minister of State, Department for Transport (Baroness Kramer) (LD): The aggregate net present value for the supply and maintenance of the new Thameslink trains (including the provision of depots) is £2.8 billion in 2014 prices. Cross London Trains Ltd will lease 1140 vehicles as 115 trains, consisting of 55 12-car units and 60 8-car units, to the Thameslink operator to support an assumption of 109 diagrams. The final number of diagrams to be operated will be determined through the planning process for the December 2018 timetable.

Thromboembolism

Questions

Asked by Lord Walton of Detchant

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the uptake of innovative anti-coagulant medicines in the management of venous thromboembolism in the National Health Service. [HL192]

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA78

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Earl Howe) (Con): Decisions on the prescribing of medicines are a matter for clinicians in discussion with their patients.

Dabigatran (Pradaxa), apixaban (Eliquis) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto) are recommended in National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) technology appraisal guidance for use in reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE)after hip or knee replacement surgery. Rivaroxaban is also recommended as a treatment option for adults with deep vein thrombosis and in the prevention of recurrent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. National Health Service commissioners are legally required by regulations to fund those treatments recommended by NICE in its technology appraisal guidance.

NHS England has advised that it is working with the Health & Social Care Information Centre as part of the National VTE Prevention Programme to analyse the uptake of medicines in this area.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre’s report on the Use of NICE appraised medicines in the NHS in England 2012, published on 21 January 2014, includes information on the usage of dabigatran etexilate, apixaban and rivaroxaban for prevention of venous thromboembolism after hip or knee replacement surgery in secondary care.

The report showed an increase in mean usage over time during 2010-2012 and an increase in the total use of the drugs over time, which had accelerated in 2012. The report is available at:

www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB13413/use-nice-app-med-nhs-exp-stat-eng-12-rep.pdf

Asked by Lord Walton of Detchant

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they are taking to ensure access to innovative medicines in order to improve the management of venous thromboembolism in the National Health Service. [HL193]

Earl Howe: The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended a number of treatments for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. National Health Service commissioners are legally required by regulations to fund those treatments recommended by NICE in its technology appraisal guidance.

We understand that NHS England has established an Innovation Programme which ensures the commissioning system promotes and supports participation of the NHS in research, translating scientific developments into benefits for patients.

Transport: Greater London

Question

Asked by Lord Kennedy of Southwark

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what infrastructure spending on transport initiatives in London they expect to be commenced in (1) the next year, and (2) the next five years.[HL108]

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA79

The Minister of State, Department for Transport (Baroness Kramer) (LD): The National Infrastructure Plan (available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-infrastructure-plan) sets out the government’s overall strategy for meeting the infrastructure needs of the UK economy. It contains major commitments for investment in important infrastructure projects, including in London, and sets a timetable for the delivery of those projects.

The majority of transport infrastructure in London is the responsibility of the Mayor for London. The Department for Transport provides the Greater London Authority (GLA) with a substantial transport grant each year, a significant proportion of which goes towards funding Transport for London’s (TfL’s) investment programme, including delivery of the tube upgrades. Please see

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/225468/tfl-spending-review-2013.pdf which gives details of what the Mayor has agreed to deliver by when over the period to 2021.

Unemployment Benefits

Question

Asked by Lord Kennedy of Southwark

To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many people registered for unemployment benefit in each year from 2008–09 to 2013–14 in (1) the United Kingdom, (2) London as a whole, and (3) each London borough.[HL310]

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA80

Lord Wallace of Saltaire (LD): The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Letter to Lord Kennedy of Southwark from Glen Watson, Director General for ONS, dated June 2014.

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking Her Majesty’s Government how many people registered for unemployment benefit in each year for 2008-09 to 2013-14 in (1) the United Kingdom, (2) London as a whole, and (3) each London borough. (HL310)

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) compiles the number of claimants of Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) from the JobcentrePlus Administrative system. Unfortunately it is not possible to provide information on the number of individual people who registered for JSA at some point over the year for the requested geographies. However it is possible to provide information on both the number of unique claims that started during the year and the level of claimants at a point during the year.

Table 1 shows the number of unique claims that started during the requested periods. It should be noted that an individual may have more than one unique claim during each period.

Table 2 shows the number of live claims on the May count date of each year from 2008 to 2014.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at http://www.nomisweb.co.uk.

Table 1: Number of unique 1 claims of Jobseeker's Allowance
April 2008 to March 2009April 2009 to March 2010April 2010 to March 2011April 2011 to March 2012April 2012 to March 2013April 2013 to March 2014

United Kingdom

3,483,174

4,065,097

3,872,231

3,739,804

3,618,104

3,027,550

London

453,494

570,668

546,051

512,493

515,475

422,579

Barking and Dagenham

13,491

16,223

15,816

15,054

15,851

12,949

Barnet

15,480

20,187

17,938

17,137

17,066

14,247

Bexley

10,488

13,641

12,361

12,268

11,838

9,526

Brent

18,167

22,887

22,961

22,056

22,212

18,281

Bromley

12,478

16,447

14,837

13,995

13,464

11,020

Camden

11,692

14,844

13,667

12,256

12,223

9,943

City of London

261

332

241

216

241

217

Croydon

20,249

25,633

25,708

25,062

24,839

20,308

Ealing

18,762

22,749

22,945

20,801

20,753

17,116

Enfield

18,290

23,202

22,304

21,395

21,329

17,816

Greenwich

15,965

20,186

19,459

18,962

18,439

14,662

Hackney

19,502

24,217

23,025

20,724

20,825

17,559

Hammersmith and Fulham

10,843

13,377

11,625

10,932

11,361

8,863

Haringey

17,904

21,854

21,586

19,863

21,118

17,617

Harrow

10,275

13,287

12,533

11,264

10,906

8,631

Havering

11,654

14,745

13,799

13,005

13,194

10,754

Hillingdon

13,035

16,745

16,498

15,393

14,841

12,146

Hounslow

13,282

17,831

16,932

15,508

14,788

11,790

Islington

13,861

16,778

16,332

15,011

15,138

12,296

Kensington and Chelsea

6,622

8,172

7,490

6,914

7,160

5,787

Kingston upon Thames

5,728

7,584

6,705

6,352

5,877

4,822

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA81

18 Jun 2014 : Column WA82

Lambeth

21,162

26,521

25,759

23,498

23,466

19,374

Lewisham

19,859

25,067

24,712

23,145

22,640

19,045

Merton

8,542

11,462

10,742

9,989

9,694

7,910

Newham

19,790

23,881

24,538

23,980

26,361

21,267

Redbridge

14,329

18,176

16,534

15,758

15,999

12,548

Richmond upon Thames

5,732

7,823

6,689

6,125

6,140

4,944

Southwark

18,015

22,091

22,816

21,864

22,376

18,602

Sutton

8,143

10,913

9,755

9,433

8,609

6,739

Tower Hamlets

18,758

22,674

21,887

20,373

21,813

18,178

Waltham Forest

17,572

21,521

20,030

19,177

19,561

16,479

Wandsworth

13,305

17,391

15,898

14,258

14,461

12,347

Westminster

10,258

12,227

11,929

10,725

10,892

8,796

Source: Jobcentre Plus Administrative Sys tem

1 Individual claimants may have more than one unique claim in any period.

Table 2: Number of claimants of Jobseeker's Allowance
May 2008May 2009May 2010May 2011May 2012May 2013May 2014

United Kingdom

831,851

1,564,978

1,502,155

1,504,913

1,590,708

1,495,758

1,089,976

London

130,603

214,281

218,734

225,851

227,451

213,302

155,999

Barking and Dagenham

3,777

6,284

6,693

6,902

7,217

6,937

4,789

Barnet

3,761

6,812

6,765

6,805

6,779

6,308

4,800

Bexley

2,321

4,931

4,555

4,495

4,555

4,423

2,815

Brent

5,925

8,733

9,323

9,711

9,981

9,627

7,161

Bromley

3,014

6,013

5,319

5,572

5,910

5,013

3,546

Camden

3,784

5,353

5,650

5,656

5,315

4,770

3,564

City of London

110

168

145

113

117

98

92

Croydon

5,118

8,931

9,472

9,957

10,723

9,477

6,620

Ealing

4,924

8,815

8,815

8,954

8,956

8,623

6,608

Enfield

5,329

8,751

9,371

10,146

10,033

9,611

7,062

Greenwich

4,407

7,481

7,215

7,562

8,112

7,565

5,562

Hackney

6,296

9,372

9,596

11,015

10,395

9,562

7,166

Hammersmith and Fulham

3,216

5,154

4,910

5,324

4,825

4,767

3,645

Haringey

6,288

9,127

9,734

10,432

9,986

9,341

7,297

Harrow

2,188

4,314

4,323

4,139

4,172

3,605

2,803

Havering

2,309

5,369

5,233

5,166

5,482

5,091

3,440

Hillingdon

2,739

5,710

5,888

4,899

5,213

4,850

3,532

Hounslow

2,667

5,229

5,196

5,197

4,979

4,880

3,700

Islington

4,726

7,131

7,430

7,188

6,928

6,542

4,985

Kensington and Chelsea

2,098

3,319

3,439

3,444

3,169

2,891

2,096

Kingston upon Thames

1,090

2,457

2,153

1,917

1,931

1,808

1,392

Lambeth

7,061

10,486

11,433

11,831

11,858

11,482

8,511

Lewisham

5,711

8,954

9,238

9,933

10,482

9,713

7,066

Merton

2,066

3,739

3,717

3,767

3,919

3,695

2,804

Newham

6,923

9,840

10,167

11,341

11,329

10,810

7,573

Redbridge

3,718

6,589

6,723

6,842

6,823

6,236

4,278

Richmond upon Thames

1,160

2,616

2,226

1,934

1,907

1,945

1,570

Southwark

6,450

9,340

10,045

10,704

11,045

10,175

7,714

Sutton

1,680

3,535

3,434

3,430

3,500

3,211

2,207

Tower Hamlets

7,506

10,106

10,312

10,537

10,605

9,951

6,950

Waltham Forest

5,328

8,372

8,526

9,256

9,769

9,307

6,630

Wandsworth

3,783

6,455

6,538

6,384

6,363

6,362

4,567

Westminster

3,130

4,795

5,150

5,298

5,073

4,626

3,454