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Contaminated Blood (Support for Infected and Bereaved Persons) Bill [HL] 2010-12

Type of Bill:
Private Members' Bill (Starting in the House of Lords)
Sponsors:
Lord Morris of Manchester
Mr Tom Clarke

Progress of the Bill

Bill started in the House of Lords

  1. House of Lords
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  2. House of Commons
    1. 1st reading
    2. 2nd reading
    3. Committee stage
    4. Report stage
    5. 3rd reading
  3. Consideration of Amendments
  4. Royal Assent

Next event

  • 2nd reading: House of Commons 2nd reading: House of Commons | 27.04.2012

Latest Bill

House Bill Date
Lords Bill 109 2010-11 as brought from the Lords | PDF version, 90KB 18.11.2010

Latest news on the Bill

The sponsoring MP has nominated 27 April 2012 for the second reading. As the House is not expected to sit on this day it is unlikely to be debated on this date.

This Bill was introduced to Parliament on 26 May 2010 under the Ten Minute Rule. This allows an MP to make his or her case for a new bill in a speech lasting up to ten minutes. An opposing speech may also be made before the House decides whether or not the bill should be introduced. If the MP is successful the bill is taken to have had its first reading.

This Bill is a Private Member’s Bill. These are often not printed until close to the second reading debate. If the text is not yet available here and you wish to know more about this bill please contact its sponsors, Mr Tom Clarke or Lord Morris of Manchester.

Summary of the Bill

The purpose of the Bill is to provide support for people who have been infected with certain diseases as a result of receiving contaminated blood and blood products supplied by the National Health Service. The Bill would establish a compensation package for people who have been infected, their widows, dependants and carers. It would also set up a committee to advise on the treatment of haemophilia and a review into the support available for infected people and their families.

Lord Morris of Manchester introduced a similar Bill with the same title in the 2009–10 parliamentary session. It completed its stages in the House of Lords on 21 January 2010, and received its first reading in the House of Commons on the same day, but made no further progress.

Key areas

  • All people with haemophilia who have received blood or blood products supplied by the NHS would be offered a test for hepatitis B and C, HIV, human T-lymphotropic virus, syphilis and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Their partners would also be eligible to receive the test.
  • All blood donors would be routinely tested for these conditions, and donated blood would be subject to prion filtration.
  • People who have been infected by contaminated blood or blood products supplied by the NHS would receive NHS compensation cards entitling them to free-of-charge prescription drugs, counselling, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and home nursing, and priority NHS treatment whenever possible.
  • People who have been infected would be entitled to claim non-means tested financial compensation.
  • Widows and other dependants of people who have been infected, and those who have had to give up work to care for an infected person, would also be entitled to claim compensation.
  • A committee to advise on the treatment of haemophilia would be established. The committee would be involved in a review of the support available for people who have been infected by contaminated blood or blood products and their families.

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